Etymology
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cuck (v.)

"to void excrement," mid-15c., cukken, from Old Norse kuka "feces," from PIE root *kakka- "to defecate." From 1610s as "to put in the cucking-stool." Related: Cucked; cucking.

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inane (adj.)
1660s, "empty, void," from Latin inanis or else a back-formation from inanity (q.v.). Sense of "silly, empty-headed" is from 1819. Related: Inanely. Bailey's Dictionary (1731) has inaniloquent "given to empty talk."
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null (adj.)

"void of legal force, invalid," 1560s, from French nul, from Latin nullus "not any, none," from ne- "not, no" (from PIE root *ne- "not") + illus "any," diminutive of unus "one" (from PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique").

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*kes- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to cut."

It forms all or part of: caret; cashier (v.) "dismiss;" cassation; caste; castellan; castellated; Castile; castle; castigate; castrate; castration; chaste; chastity; chateau; chatelaine; Chester; forecastle; incest; quash (v.) "make void, annul."

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sastra- "knife, dagger;" Greek keazein "to split;" Latin carere "to be cut off from," cassus "empty, void;" Old Church Slavonic kosa "scythe."
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vacuous (adj.)
1640s, "empty" (implied in vacuousness), from Latin vacuus "empty, void, free" (from PIE *wak-, extended form of root *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out"). Figurative sense of "empty of ideas, without intelligent expression" is from 1848. Related: Vacuously.
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rescission (n.)

1610s, "action of cutting off" (a sense now obsolete); 1650s, "action of annulling," from Late Latin rescissionem (nominative rescisio) "annulment, a making void," noun of action from past-participle stem of rescindere "to cut off; abolish" (see rescind).

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vain (adj.)
c. 1300, "devoid of real value, idle, unprofitable," from Old French vain, vein "worthless, void, invalid, feeble; conceited" (12c.), from Latin vanus "empty, void," figuratively "idle, fruitless," from PIE *wano-, suffixed form of root *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out."

Meaning "conceited, elated with a high opinion of oneself" first recorded 1690s in English; earlier "silly, idle, foolish" (late 14c.). Phrase in vain "to no effect" (c. 1300, after Latin in vanum) preserves the original sense. Related: Vainly; vainness. Compare also vainglory.
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caca (n.)
"excrement," c. 1870, slang, probably from Spanish or another language that uses it, ultimately from PIE root *kakka- "to defecate," which forms the base word for "excrement, to void excrement" in many Indo-European languages.
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cack (n.)
"excrement, act of voiding excrement," Old English (in cac-hus); as a verb, "to void excrement," mid-15c., from Latin cacare (see caca). Related: Cacked; cacking. Cack-handed (also cag-handed) "left-handed; awkward" is from 1854.
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nullify (v.)

"render legally null and void, render invalid," 1590s, from Late Latin nullificare "to esteem lightly, despise," literally "to make nothing," from Latin nullus "not any" (see null) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Nullified; nullifying; nullifier.

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