Etymology
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ultraviolet (adj.)
"beyond the violet end of the visible spectrum," 1840, from ultra- "beyond" + violet. Ultra-red (1870) was a former name for what now is called infra-red.
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panoptic (adj.)

"all-seeing," 1826, from Greek panoptēs "all-seeing," from pan- "all" (see pan-) + optos "seen, visible" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). Related: Panoptical.

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steeplechase (n.)
1793 (earlier steeplehunt, 1772), from steeple + chase (n.). Originally an open-country horse race with a visible church steeple as a goal.
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tracer (n.)
c. 1500, "one who tracks or searches," agent noun from verb form of trace (n.1). Meaning "bullet whose course is made visible" is from 1910.
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pixelation (n.)

also pixellation, graphics display effect in which individual pixels (small, square single-colored display elements that comprise the image) are visible, 1991, from pixel + -ation.

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enoptomancy (n.)
divination by means of a mirror, 1855, from Greek enoptos, literally "seen in," from en- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + optos "seen, visible" (from PIE root *okw- "to see") + -mancy.
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topless (adj.)
of women, "bare-breasted," 1966, from top (n.1) + -less. Earlier it was used of men's bathing suits (1937) and women's (1964). Earliest sense is "without a visible summit; immeasurably high" (1580s).
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Phanerozoic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the whole of geological time since the beginning of the Cambrian," so called from the abundant evidence of life preserved in the rocks, 1930; see phanero- "visible, manifest" + zoic "pertaining to life."

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psychedelic (adj.)

occasionally psychodelic, "producing expanded consciousness through heightened awareness and feeling," 1956, of drugs, suggested by British-born Canadian psychiatrist Humphry Osmond in a letter to Aldous Huxley and used by Osmond in a scientific paper published the next year; from Greek psykhē "mind" (see psyche) + dēloun "make visible, reveal" (from dēlos "visible, clear," from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine").

In popular use from 1965 with reference to anything producing effects or sensations similar to the common perception of the effects of a psychedelic drug. As a noun, "a psychedelic drug," from 1956.

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phanopoeia (n.)

1929, Pound's term for "a casting of images upon the visual imagination" in literature, from Greek phanai "to show, make visible, bring to light" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine") + poiein "to make, create" (see poet).

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