Etymology
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terrorism (n.)

1795, in specific sense of "government intimidation during the Reign of Terror in France" (March 1793-July 1794), from French terrorisme, noted in English by 1795 as a coinage of the Revolution, from Latin terror "great fear, dread, alarm, panic; object of fear, cause of alarm; terrible news," from PIE root *tres- "to tremble" (see terrible).

If the basis of a popular government in peacetime is virtue, its basis in a time of revolution is virtue and terror — virtue, without which terror would be barbaric; and terror, without which virtue would be impotent. [Robespierre, speech in French National Convention, 1794]

General sense of "systematic use of terror as a policy" is first recorded in English 1798 (in reference to the Irish Rebellion of that year). At one time, a word for a certain kind of mass-destruction terrorism was dynamitism (1883); and during World War I frightfulness (translating German Schrecklichkeit) was used in Britain for "deliberate policy of terrorizing enemy non-combatants."

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insider (n.)
"one in possession of special information by virtue of being within some organization," 1848, from inside (n.) + -er (1). Originally in reference to the stock markets.
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polymerization (n.)

"the property of certain compounds by virtue of which they differ in molecular weight and chemical properties though formed from the same elements in the same proportion," 1866, from polymer + -ization.

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ostensive (adj.)

c. 1600, in logic, "setting forth a general principle by virtue of which a proposition must be true," from Late Latin ostensivus "showing," from Latin ostens-, past-participle stem of ostendere "to show" (see ostensible). Related: Ostensively.

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fortitude (n.)

late 14c., "moral strength (as a cardinal virtue); courage," from Latin fortitudo "strength, force, firmness, manliness," from fortis "strong, brave" (see fort). From early 15c. as "physical strength."

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probity (n.)

"tried virtue or integrity, strict honesty," early 15c., probite, from Old French probité, from Latin probitatem (nominative probitas) "uprightness, honesty," from probus "worthy, good" (see prove).

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inefficacy (n.)
"want of force or virtue to produce the desired effect," 1610s, from Late Latin inefficacia, from inefficacem (nominative inefficax), from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Latin efficax "powerful, effectual, efficient" (see efficacy).
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goodness (n.)
Old English godnes "goodness, virtue, kindliness;" see good (adj.) + -ness. In exclamations from 1610s as a term of emphasis, first recorded in for goodnesse sake, i.e. "as you trust in the divine goodness" (i.e., God).
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levitate (v.)
1670s, "to rise by virtue of lightness" (intransitive), from Latin levitas "lightness," on the model of gravitate (compare levity). Transitive sense of "raise (a person) into the air, cause to become buoyant" (1870s) is mainly from spiritualism. Related: Levitated; levitating.
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exemplar (n.)
late 14c., "original model of the universe in the mind of God," later (mid-15c.) "model of virtue," from Old French exemplaire (14c.) and directly from Late Latin exemplarium, from Latin exemplum "a copy, pattern, model" (see example). Related: Exemplarily.
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