Etymology
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revitalization (n.)

"act or fact of being given fresh life and vigor, act of revitalizing," 1869, noun of action from revitalize.

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spiritless (adj.)
1560s, "dead," from spirit (n.) + -less. Meaning "having no vigor or vivacity" is from 1650s. Related: Spiritlessly.
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vim (n.)
1843, usually said to be from Latin vim, accusative of vis "strength, force, power, vigor, energy," from Proto-Italic *wis-, traditionally from PIE root *weie- "to go after, pursue with vigor or desire," with noun derivatives indicating "force, power" (see gain (v.)) and related to the root of virile. But de Vaan seems to have doubts ("more easily explained from an original root noun"), and based on the early uses OED suggests the possibility that the English word is of "a purely inventive or interjectional origin."
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reinvigorate (v.)

also re-invigorate, "revive vigor in, reanimate," 1650s, from re- "back, again" + invigorate (v.). Related: Reinvigorated; reinvigorating; reinvigoration.

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feckless (adj.)
1590s, from feck, "effect, value, vigor" (late 15c.), Scottish shortened form of effect (n.), + -less. Popularized by Carlyle, who left its opposite, feckful, in dialectal obscurity. Related: Fecklessly; fecklessness.
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reanimation (n.)

also re-animation, "reviving from apparent death; act or action of giving fresh spirits or vigor," 1777, from re- "back, again" + animation or else a noun formed to go with reanimate (v.).

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blaze (v.1)
"to burst into flame, burn brightly or vigorously," c. 1200, from blaze (n.1). To blaze away "fire (guns or cannon) continuously" is by 1776, hence "work with vigor and enthusiasm." Related: Blazed; blazing.
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audacity (n.)
early 15c., "boldness, courage, daring; vigor, animation," from Medieval Latin audacitas "boldness," from Latin audacis genitive of audax "bold, daring; rash, foolhardy" (see audacious). In English, the meaning "presumptuous impudence," implying contempt of moral restraint, is from 1530s.
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vivacity (n.)
early 15c., "liveliness, vigor," from Old French vivacite or directly from Latin vivacitatem (nominative vivacitas) "vital force, liveliness," from vivax (genitive vivacis) "lively," also "long-lived," from vivere "to live" (see vital).
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fade (n.)
early 14c., "loss of freshness or vigor," from fade (adj.), c. 1300, " lacking in brilliance; pale, discolored, dull," from Old French fade (see fade (v.)). As a type of tapering hairstyle from 1988 (fade-out style is in a 1985 "Ebony" article on men's haircuts).
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