Etymology
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burglary (n.)

"crime of housebreaking," c. 1200, from Anglo-Latin burglaria (see burglar). The Old English word was husbreche.

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exculpation (n.)

"the act of exonerating from a charge of fault or crime; vindication," 1715, noun of action from exculpate.

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misdoing (n.)

"a wrong done, a fault or crime," early 13c., verbal noun from misdo.

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penology (n.)

"study of punishment for crime and crime prevention," 1838, coined apparently by Francis Lieber, corresponding member of the Philadephia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons, from pen- as in penitentiary (ultimately from Latin poena "penalty, punishment;" see penal) + -ology "study of." Related: Penologist; penological.

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recriminate (v.)

"return one accusation with another, charge an accuser with a like crime," c. 1600, from Medieval Latin recriminatus, past participle of recriminari "to make charges against," from Latin re- "back, again" (see re-) + criminari "to accuse," from crimen (genitive criminis) "a charge" (see crime). Related: Recriminated; recriminating.

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delinquency (n.)

"failure or omission of duty or obligation," 1630s, from Late Latin delinquentia "fault, crime, delinquency," from Latin delinquentem (see delinquent).

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culpability (n.)

"blamableness," 1670s, from Late Latin culpabilitas "guilt, culpability," from Latin culpabilis "worthy of blame," from culpare "to blame," from culpa "crime, fault, blame, guilt, error." 

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Runyonesque (adj.)

by 1938 in reference to Damon Runyon (1884-1946), U.S. writer of popular crime stories featuring tough characters and underworld jargon.

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organized (adj.)

1590s, "furnished with organs," past-participle adjective from organize (v.). Meaning "forming a whole of interdependent parts" is from 1817. Organized crime is attested from 1849.

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connive (v.)

c. 1600, "shut one's eyes to something one does not like but cannot help," from Latin connivere, also conivere "to wink," hence, figuratively, "to wink at (a crime), be secretly privy," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + base akin to nictare "to wink" (from PIE root *kneigwh-; see nictitate). From 1630s as "conceal knowledge (of a fault or crime of another); give silent encouragement to a culpable person." From 1797 as "be in secret complicity." Related: Connived; conniving.

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