Etymology
Advertisement
-rigged 

1769, of a vessel, "equipped with rigging" (of a specified sort), from rig (v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
vasodilation (n.)

1896, from vasopressor, from vaso-, combining form of Latin vas "container, vessel" (see vas) + dilation. Related: Vasodilator (1881).

Related entries & more 
vasopressin (n.)

1928, from vasopressor "causing the constriction of (blood) vessels) (from vaso-, combining form of Latin vas "container, vessel;" see vas) + -in (2).

Related entries & more 
fore-and-aft (adj.)

nautical, "stem-to-stern," 1610s; see fore + aft. Especially of sails set on the lengthwise line of the vessel (1820), or of vessels so rigged.

Related entries & more 
decant (v.)

1630s, "pour off gently the clear liquid from a solution by tipping the vessel," originally an alchemical term, from French décanter, perhaps from Medieval Latin decanthare "to pour from the edge of a vessel," from de- "off, away" (see de-) + Medieval Latin canthus "corner, lip of a jug," from Latin cantus, canthus "iron rim around a carriage wheel" (see cant (n.2)). Related: Decanted; decanting.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
shipmate (n.)

"one who serves in the same vessel with another," 1748, from ship (n.) + mate (n.1).

Related entries & more 
angiosperm (n.)

"plant with seeds contained in a protective vessel" (as distinguished from a gymnosperm, in which the seeds are naked), 1852, from Modern Latin Angiospermae, coined 1690 by German botanist Paul Hermann (1646-1695), from Greek angeion "vessel" (see angio-) + spermos, adjective from sperma "seed" (see sperm). So called because the seeds in this class of plants are enclosed. Related: Angiospermous.

Related entries & more 
freighter (n.)

1620s, "one who loads (a ship)," agent noun from freight (v.). Meaning "a cargo vessel" is from 1839, American English.

Related entries & more 
piss-pot (n.)

"chamber-pot, earthenware vessel for urine," mid-15c., pisse-pot, from piss + pot (n.1).

Related entries & more 
bowl (n.1)

"round, low vessel to hold liquids or liquid food," Old English bolla "pot, cup, bowl," from Proto-Germanic *bul- "a round vessel" (source also of Old Norse bolle, Old High German bolla), from PIE root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell." Formerly also "a large drinking cup," hence figurative use as an emblem of festivity or drunkenness. In reference to a football-stadium 1913, originally one that is bowl-shaped.

Related entries & more 

Page 2