Etymology
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pleat (v.)

"to fold or gather in pleats," 1560s, used as the verb version of plait (n.) and probably representing an alternative pronunciation. Related: Pleated; pleating.

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upgrade (n.)
also up-grade, 1847, "upward slope," from up (adj.) + grade (n.). The meaning "upgraded version" is recorded from 1980.
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Caliban (n.)
"degraded and bestial man," from the name of Shakespeare's character in "The Tempest" (1610), which is from a version of cannibal with -n- and -l- interchanged found in Hakluyt's "Voyages" (1599).
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pentathlon (n.)

"athletic contest of five separate events involving the same competitors and all taking place on the same day," 1650s, from Greek pentathlon "the contest of five exercises," from pente "five" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + athlon "prize, contest," a word of uncertain origin. Earlier in English in Latin form pentathlum (1706). The Greek version consisted of jumping, sprinting, discus and spear throwing, and wrestling. The modern version (1912) consists of horseback riding, fencing, shooting, swimming, and cross-country running. Related: Pentathlete.

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synthesizer (v.)
1869, agent noun from synthesize. As a type of instrument for generating musical or vocal sounds from 1909; the electronic version is from 1950s.
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ad infinitum 
"endlessly," Latin, literally "to infinity" from ad "to, unto" (see ad-) + infinitum "infinity," neuter accusative of adjective infinitus "endless" (see infinite). English version to infinity is attested from 1630s.
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tricycle (n.)
1828, "three-wheeled horse-drawn carriage," from French tricycle (1827); see tri- + cycle (n.). The pedal-powered version is first attested 1868.
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Shangri La (n.)
imaginary earthly paradise, 1938, from Shangri La, name of Tibetan utopia in James Hilton's novel "Lost Horizon" (1933, film version 1937). In Tibetan, la means "mountain pass."
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Horace 
masc. proper name, from French, from Latin Horatius, name of a Roman gens. The poet was Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65-8 B.C.E.). The form Horatio is influenced by the Italian version of the name, Orazio.
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pushmi-pullyu (n.)

fictional two-headed mammal from "Dr. Dolittle" (1922), coined by Hugh Lofting from the expressions push me, pull you. Popularized by the 1967 film version of the book.

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