Etymology
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blood-red (adj.)
"blood-colored," Old English blodread; see blood (n.) + red (adj.1). Compare Dutch bloedrood, German blutroth, Old Norse bloðrauðr.
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blood-stained (adj.)
"stained with blood; guilty of slaughter," 1590s, from blood (n.) + past participle of stain (v.).
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blood-letting (n.)
also bloodletting, early 13c., blod letunge, from blood (n.) + letting. Hyphenated from 17c., one word from mid-19c. Old English had blodlæte "blood-letting," from blodlætan "to bleed, let blood."
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blood-stream (n.)
also bloodstream, 1847, from blood (n.) + stream (n.).
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angiography (n.)
1731, "description of the vessels of the body" (blood and nymph), from angio- "blood vessel" + -graphy.
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angio- 

before vowels angi-, word-forming element meaning "vessel of the body," now often "covered or enclosed by a seed or blood vessel," from Latinized form of Greek angeion "case, capsule, vessel of the body," diminutive of angos "vessel, jar, vat, vase," which is of unknown origin. Beekes says "Possibly a Mediterranean loanword ..., as kitchen utensils are often borrowed."

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vasopressin (n.)
1928, from vasopressor "causing the constriction of (blood) vessels) (from vaso-, combining form of Latin vas "container, vessel;" see vas) + -in (2).
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vas (n.)
in anatomy, "a tube, duct, or conduit for conveying blood, lymph, semen, etc.," plural vasa, Latin, literally "vessel." Vas deferens (plural vasa defferentia) is from 1570s.
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intravenous (adj.)
"in or occurring within a vein," 1847, from intra- "within, inside" + Latin venous, from vena "vein" (see vein). Related: Intravenously.
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artery (n.)
late 14c., "an arterial blood vessel," from Anglo-French arterie, Old French artaire (13c.; Modern French artère), and directly from Latin arteria, from Greek arteria "windpipe," also "an artery," as distinct from a vein; related to aeirein "to raise" (see aorta).

They were regarded by the ancients as air ducts because the arteries do not contain blood after death, and 14c.-16c. artery in English also could mean "trachea, windpipe." Medieval writers, based on Galen, generally took them as a separate blood system for the "vital spirits." The word is used in reference to artery-like systems of major rivers from 1805; of railways from 1844.
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