Etymology
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Sebastian 
masc. proper name, from Latin Sebastianus, from Greek Sebastianos, "man of Sebastia," a city in Pontus that was named for Augustus Caesar, first Roman emperor, from Greek sebastos "venerable," a translation of Latin augustus, the epithet of Caesar.
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Priscilla 

fem. proper name, from Latin, fem. of Priscillus, diminutive of Priscus (fem. Prisca), from priscus "antique, ancient, of old; old-fashioned, primitive, venerable," from *pris-ko-, adjective from *pris-, *pri "before," probably from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before, first."

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antiquate (v.)
"make old or obsolete," 1590s, from Latin antiquatus, past participle of antiquare "restore to its ancient condition," in Late Latin "make old," from antiquus "ancient, of olden times; aged, venerable; old-fashioned" (see antique (adj.)). Related: Antiquated; antiquating.
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antiquarian (n.)
"one who studies or is fond of antiquities, one versed in knowledge of ancient things," c. 1600, with -an + Latin antiquarius "pertaining to antiquity," from antiquus "ancient, aged, venerable" (see antique (adj.)). In later use more specifically "collector of antiquities; dealer in old books, coins, objects of art, etc." As an adjective, "pertaining to antiquaries," from 1771. Compare antiquary.
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antiquary (n.)
1580s, "one versed in knowledge of ancient things," from Latin antiquarius "pertaining to antiquity," in Medieval Latin "a copier of old books," from antiquus "ancient, aged, venerable" (see antique (adj.)). In later use especially "dealer in old books, coins, objects of art, etc."
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guru (n.)

1806, gooroo, from Hindi guru "teacher, priest," from Sanskrit guru-s "one to be honored, teacher," from guru- "venerable, worthy of honor," literally "heavy, weighty," from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy." Generalized sense of "mentor" is from 1940 (in H.G. Wells); sense of "expert in something" first recorded c. 1966 in Canadian English in reference to Marshall McLuhan.

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antiquated (adj.)
1620s, past-participle adjective from verb antiquate "make old or obsolete" (1590s), from Latin antiquatus, past participle of antiquare "restore to its ancient condition," in Late Latin "make old," from antiquus "ancient, of olden times; aged, venerable; old-fashioned" (see antique (adj.)). An older adjective in the same sense was antiquate (early 15c.), from Latin. Related: Antiquatedness.
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redoubtable (adj.)

late 14c., of persons, "worthy of honor, venerable" (a sense now obsolete); late 15c., "that is to be dreaded or feared, formidable, terrible," also often "valiant," from Old French redoutable (12c.), from redouter "to dread," from re-, intensive prefix, + douter "be afraid of" (see doubt (v.)).

The verb also was in Middle English, redouten, "to fear, dread; stand in awe or apprehension of; honor" (late 14c., from Old French) and was used through 19c., though OED marks it "now rhetorical."

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nuanced (adj.)

"having or showing delicate gradations in tone, etc.," 1896, past-participle adjective from the verb nuance (q.v.).

The new co-operative history of English literature which the University of Cambridge is now publishing prints "genre" without italics. And it even permits one contributor—and a contributor who is discussing Shakespeare!—to say that something is delicately "nuanced." Is there now an English verb "to nuance"? It is terrible to think of the bad language the scholars of the venerable English university might have used if "nuanced" had been first discovered in the text of an American author. [Scribner's Magazine," January 1911]
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*gwere- (1)
gwerə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "heavy."

It forms all or part of: aggravate; aggravation; aggrieve; bar (n.4) "unit of pressure;" bariatric; baritone; barium; barometer; blitzkrieg; brig; brigade; brigand; brigantine; brio; brut; brute; charivari; gravamen; grave (adj.); gravid; gravimeter; gravitate; gravity; grief; grieve; kriegspiel; guru; hyperbaric; isobar; quern; sitzkrieg.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit guruh "heavy, weighty, venerable;" Greek baros "weight," barys "heavy in weight," often with the notion of "strength, force;" Latin gravis, "heavy, ponderous, burdensome, loaded; pregnant;" Old English cweorn "quern;" Gothic kaurus "heavy;" Lettish gruts "heavy."
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