Etymology
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apsis (n.)

"perigee of the moon, perihelion of a planet" (plural apsides), 1650s, from Latin apsis "arch, vault" (see apse).

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cavern (n.)

"large, natural cave under the earth," late 14c., from Old French caverne (12c.) "cave, vault, cellar," from Late Latin caverna "cave," from Latin cavus "hollow" (from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole"). In Old English such a land feature might be called an eorðscræf.

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cave (n.)

"a hollow place in the earth, a natural cavity of considerable size and extending more or less horizontally," early 13c., from Old French cave "a cave, vault, cellar" (12c.), from Latin cavea "hollow" (place), noun use of neuter plural of adjective cavus "hollow," from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole." Replaced Old English eorðscrafu.

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archway (n.)
"entrance or passageway under an arch or vault," also arch-way, 1788, from arch (n.) + way (n.).
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ogee (n.)

in architecture, "an S-shaped molding," 1670s, said to be from a corruption of French ogive "diagonal rib of a vault" of a type normal in 13c. French architecture, earlier augive, a word of unknown origin. According to Watkins, in part from Latin via "way, road" (see via). Related: ogival. Middle English had ogif (late 13c.) "a stone for the diagonal rib of a vault," from the French word and Medieval Latin ogiva.

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cavity (n.)

"a hollow place, empty space in the body," 1540s, from French cavité (13c.), from Late Latin cavitatem (nominative cavitas) "hollowness," from Latin cavus "hollow" (from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole").

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concavity (n.)

c. 1400, "a concave surface," from Old French concavit "hollow, concavity" (14c.) or directly from Latin concavitatem (nominative concavitas), from Latin concavus "hollow, arched, vaulted, curved," from con-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + cavus "hollow" (from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole"). From 1570s as "state of being concave."

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coeliac (adj.)

"pertaining to the cavity of the abdomen," 1660s, from Latin coeliacus, from Greek koiliakos "pertaining to the bowels," also "pain in the bowels," from koilia "bowels, abdominal cavity, intestines, tripe" from koilos "hollow," from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole."

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drive-through (adj.)

"that may be used or experienced while driving a car," 1949 (in an advertisement for the Beer Vault Drive-Thru in Ann Arbor, Michigan), from the verbal phrase; see drive (v.) + through (adv.).

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codeine (n.)

"white crystalline alkaloid present in opium," 1838, codeina, from French codéine, coined, with chemical suffix -ine (2), from Greek kodeia "poppy head," related to koos "prison," literally "hollow place;" kodon "bell, mouth of a trumpet;" koilos "hollow, hollowed out, spacious, deep," all from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole." Modern form is from 1881.

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