Etymology
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clip (n.2)

mid-15c., clips, "shears," from clip (v.1). Meaning "act of clipping" is from 1825, originally of sheep-shearing, later of haircuts. Meaning "rate of speed" is 1867 (compare clipper). Meaning "an extract from a movie" is from 1958.

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pullout (n.)

also pull-out, 1820, "a withdrawal," from the verbal phrase; see pull (v.) + out (adv.). The phrase pull out "extract, remove" is attested from late 14c. As "detachable section or page of a newspaper, magazine, etc." by 1952, short for pull-out section (by 1949). As an adjective by 1875.

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disburse (v.)

1520s, disbourse, "pay out or expend (money," from Old French desbourser "extract (money) from a purse, spend (money)" (13c., Modern French débourser), from des- (see dis-) + bourse "purse" (see bursar). Related: Disbursed; disbursing.

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educe (v.)
early 15c., in the literal sense, "to draw out, extract; branch out," from Latin educere "to lead out, bring out" (troops, ships, etc.; see educate). Meaning "bring into view or operation" is from c. 1600. Meaning "to draw a conclusion from data" is from 1837.
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extraction (n.)

early 15c., "process of withdrawing or obtaining" (something, from something else), from Old French estraction "extraction, origin" (12c.) or directly from Medieval Latin extractionem (nominative extractio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin extrahere "to draw out" (see extract (v.)). Meaning "that which is extracted" is from 1590s. Meaning "descent, lineage" is from late 15c.

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pericope (n.)

"an extract, a selection from a book," especially "a passage of Scripture appointed to be read on certain occasions," 1650s, from Late Latin pericope "section of a book," from Greek perikopē "a section" of a book, literally "a cutting all round," from peri "around, about" (see peri-) + kopē "a cutting" (see hatchet).

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scavenge (v.)

1640s, transitive, "cleanse from filth," a back-formation from scavenger (q.v.). The intransitive meaning "search through rubbish" for usable food or objects is suggested by 1880s; the transitive sense of "extract and collect anything usable from discarded material" is by 1922. Related: Scavenged; scavenging.

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infusion (n.)
c. 1400, "a liquid extract (obtained by soaking in water);" early 15c., "a pouring in; that which is poured in," from Old French infusion "injection" (13c.) or directly from Latin infusionem (nominative infusio) "a pouring in, a watering," noun of action from past participle stem of infundere "to pour into" (see infuse).
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anther (n.)

1550s, "medical extract of flowers," from French anthère or Modern Latin anthera "a medicine extracted from a flower," from Greek anthera, fem. of antheros "flowery, blooming," from anthos "flower," from PIE root *andh- "to bloom" (source also of Sanskrit andhas "herb," Armenian and "field," Middle Irish ainder "young girl," Welsh anner "young cow"). The botanical sense of "polliniferous part of a stamen" attested by 1791.

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valence (n.)
early 15c., "extract, preparation," from Latin valentia "strength, capacity," from valentem (nominative valens) "strong, stout, vigorous, powerful," present participle of valere "be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). Chemistry sense of "relative combining capacity of an element with other atoms when forming compounds or molecules" is recorded from 1884, from German Valenz (1868), from the Latin word. Related: Valency.
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