Etymology
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uremia (n.)
1857, Modern Latin, from Latinized form of Greek ouron "urine" (see urine) + haima "blood" (see -emia) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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urethra (n.)
"canal through which urine is discharged from the bladder," 1630s, from Late Latin urethra, from Greek ourethra "the passage for urine," coined by Hippocrates from ourein "to urinate," from ouron (see urine). Related: Urethral.
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proteinuria 

"presence of abnormal levels of protein in the urine," 1911, Modern Latin, from French protéinurie; see protein + urine + abstract noun ending -ia.

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urination (n.)
early 15c., from Medieval Latin urinationem (nominative urinatio), noun of action from past participle stem of urinare (v.), from urina (see urine.
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urinate (v.)
1590s, back-formation from urination or else from Medieval Latin urinatus, past participle of urinare, from urina (see urine). Related: Urinated; urinating.
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ureter (n.)
1570s, from medical Latin ureter, from Greek oureter "urinary duct of the kidneys," from ourein "to urinate," from ouron (see urine). Related: Ureteral.
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diuresis (n.)

"excessive secretion of urine," 1680s, medical Latin, from Greek diourein "to urinate," from dia "through" (see dia-) + ourein "urinate," from ouron (see urine) + -esis.

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urinal (n.)
c. 1200, "glass vial to receive urine for medical inspection," from Old French urinal, from Late Latin urinal, from urinalis (adj.) "relating to urine," from Latin urina (see urine). Meaning "chamber pot" is from late 15c. Modern sense of "fixture for urinating (for men)" is attested from 1851.
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enuresis (n.)
minor urinary incontinence, 1800, medical Latin, from Greek enourein "to urinate in," from en "in" (see en- (2)) + ourein "to urinate," from ouron (see urine).
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diuretic 

as an adjective, "inducing or promoting urination;" as a noun, "medicine that promotes urination;" c. 1400 diuretik (adjective and noun), from Old French diuretique, from Late Latin diureticus, from Greek diouretikos "prompting urine," from diourein "urinate," from dia "through" (see dia-) + ourein "urinate," from ouron (see urine).

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