Etymology
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stimulant (adj.)
1772, from French stimulant or directly from Latin stimulantem (nominative stimulans), present participle of stimulare "to prick, urge, stimulate" (see stimulation). As a noun from 1794.
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hortative (adj.)

"encouraging, inciting," 1620s, from Latin hortativus "that serves for encouragement," from hortat-, past participle stem of hortari "to exhort, urge, incite," from PIE root *gher- (2) "to like, want."

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instigator (n.)
1590s, from Latin instigator "a stimulator," agent noun from instigare "urge on, incite" (see instigation). The classical Latin fem. form instigatrix is recorded in English from 1610s.
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instance (v.)
"cite as an instance" (in the logical sense), c. 1600, from instance (n.). Middle English had a verb instauncen "to plead with, urge, entreat." Related: Instanced; instancing.
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glucagon (n.)
1923, from gluco- + Greek agon, present participle of agein "push forward, put in motion; stir up; excite, urge," from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move."
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admonish (v.)

mid-14c., amonesten "remind, urge, exhort, warn, give warning," from Old French amonester "urge, encourage, warn" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *admonestare, from Latin admonere "bring to mind, remind (of a debt);" also "warn, advise, urge," from ad "to," here probably with frequentative force (see ad-) + monere "to admonish, warn, advise," from PIE *moneie- "to make think of, remind," suffixed (causative) form of root *men- (1) "to think."

The -d- was restored on Latin model in English as in French (Modern French admonester). The ending was influenced by words in -ish (such as astonish, abolish). Related: Admonished; admonishing. Latin also had commonere "to remind," promonere "to warn openly," submonere "to advise privately" (source of summon).

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haste (v.)
late 13c., from Old French haster "hurry, make haste; urge, hurry along" (Modern French hâter), from haste "haste, urgency" (see haste). Now largely superseded by hasten (1560s). Related: Hasted; hasting.
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c'mon (v.)

representing the common pronunciation of the verbal phrase come on, by 1929. Come on! as an urge to advance or go with is from mid-15c. (see come).

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stimulation (n.)
1520s, "act of pricking or stirring to action," from Latin stimulationem (nominative stimulatio) "an incitement," noun of action from past participle stem of stimulare "prick, goad, urge," from stimulus "spur, goad" (see stimulus).
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deprecate (v.)

1620s, "to pray against or for deliverance from, pray the removal or deliverance from," from Latin deprecatus, past participle of deprecari "to pray (something) away," from de "away" (see de-) + precari "to pray" (from PIE root *prek- "to ask, entreat"). Meaning "to express disapproval, urge against" is from 1640s. Related: Deprecated, deprecating.

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