Etymology
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ache (n.)

"continuing pain," early 15c., æche, ece "an ache, pain," from Old English æce, from Proto-Germanic *akiz, from same source as ache (v.), which see for the unusual evolution of spelling and pronunciation.

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favored (adj.)

1725, "enjoying unusual advantages," past-participle adjective from favor (v.). In compounds or phrases, "-featured, -looking," from c. 1400 (for example, well-favored "good-looking;" worst-favored "ugliest").

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infrequent (adj.)

1530s, "little used" (now obsolete); 1610s, "not occurring often," from Latin infrequentem (nominative infrequens) "occurring seldom, unusual; not crowded, absent," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + frequens "repeated, regular, constant, often" (see frequent). Related: Infrequently.

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offbeat (adj.)

also off-beat, "unusual," 1938, from off (adv.) + beat (n.). From earlier sense in reference to the second and fourth beats in a four-beat music rhythm (1927), where the stress typically fell on the first and third. Compare upbeat.

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repine (v.)

"to manifest dissatisfaction, be fretfully discontented," mid-15c., repinen, probably from re-, here likely an intensive prefix, + pine (v.) "yearn," "but the formation is unusual" [OED]. Gray seems to have coined the transitive sense of "to long" for something (1742). Related: Repined; repining.

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bonhomie (n.)

"frank and simple good nature," 1803, from French bonhomie "good nature, easy temper," from bonhomme "good man" (with unusual loss of -m-), from bon "good" (see bon) + homme "man," from Latin homo "man" (see homunculus). The native equivalent to bonhomme is goodman. Bonhomme as "member of an order of begging friars" is from 1620s.

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specialty (n.)

c. 1300, "particular affection; special attachment or favor, partiality," from Old French especialte, more vernacular form of specialite (see speciality). Compare personalty/personality; realty/reality. From early 15c. as "unusual, or extraordinary thing; specialized branch of learning; peculiar quality, distinctive characteristic."

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bashful (adj.)

1540s, "excessively modest, shy and sheepish," with -ful + baishen "to be filled with consternation or dismay" (mid-14c.), from Old French baissier "bring down, humiliate" (see abash). An unusual case of this suffix attached to a verbal stem in the passive sense. Related: Bashfully; bashfulness (1530s).

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novel (adj.)

"new, strange, unusual, previously unknown," mid-15c., but little used before 1600, from Old French novel, nouvel "new, young, fresh, recent; additional; early, soon" (Modern French nouveau, fem. nouvelle), from Latin novellus "new, young, recent," diminutive of novus "new" (see new).

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keepsake (n.)

"anything kept or given to be kept for the sake of the giver; a token of friendship," 1790, from keep (v.) + sake (n.1); an unusual formation on model of namesake; thus an object kept for the sake of the giver. The word was used c. 1830s in titles of popular holiday gift books containing beautiful engravings and mediocre poetry. As an adjective by 1839.

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