Etymology
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re-turn (v.)

late 14c., "turn (something) over or round or back," from re- "back, again" + turn (v.). Intransitive sense is from early 15c. Related: Re-turned; re-turning.

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turn-around (n.)
also turnaround, 1936, from verbal phrase turn around "reverse," 1880, American English, from turn (v.) + around (adv.).
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hyoid (adj.)
"having the form of the Greek capital letter upsilon" (ϒ), 1811, from French hyoïde (16c.), from Modern Latin hyoides, from Greek hyoeides "shaped like the letter U," from hu "letter U" (in later Greek called upsilon) + -oeides "like" (see -oid).
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upsilon (n.)
20th letter of the Greek alphabet, 1640s, from Greek u psilon, literally "a mere (or bare) 'u;' " so called in later Greek in reference to its sound. The exact reason is variously explained, but it seems to have had something to do with distinguishing it from diphthongs.
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Uganda 
from Swahili u "land, country" + Ganda, indigenous people name, which is of unknown origin. Related: Ugandan.
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glamorize (v.)
1901, from glamour + -ize, with typical dropping of the -u- in derivatives (see -or). Related: Glamorized; glamorizing.
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brachy- 
word-forming element meaning "short," from Latinized combining form of Greek brakhys "short," from PIE root *mregh-u- "short."
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glamorous (adj.)
1875, from glamour + -ous, with typical dropping of the -u- in derivatives (see -or). Related: Glamorously.
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anastrophe (n.)
"inversion of usual word order," 1570s, from Greek anastrophe "a turning back, a turning upside down," from anastrephein "to turn up, turn back, turn upside-down," from ana "back" (see ana-) + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn").
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advert (v.)
mid-15c., averten "to turn (something) aside" (the mind, the attention, etc.), from Old French avertir (later advertir) "to turn, direct; turn aside; make aware, inform" (12c.), from Latin advertere "turn toward, turn to," from ad "toward" (see ad-) + vertere "to turn" (see versus). The -d- was restored in English 16c. Especially in speaking or writing, "turn to (a topic) abruptly and plainly" (18c.). Related: Adverted; adverting.
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