Etymology
Advertisement
unturned (adj.)

1540s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of turn (v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
inturned (adj.)

"turned inward," 1843, from in (adv.) + past participle of turn (v.).

Related entries & more 
upturn (n.)

1868, "upturned part," from up (adv.) + turn (n.). Meaning "improvement" (especially in economics) is from 1930.

Related entries & more 
turntable (n.)

also turn-table, "circular platform designed to turn upon its center," 1835, originally in the railroad sense, from turn (v.) + table (n.). The record-player sense is attested from 1908.

Related entries & more 
turnbuckle (n.)

also turn-buckle, 1703, "catch or fastening for windows and shutters," from turn (v.) + buckle (n.). Meaning "coupling with internal screw threads for connecting metal rods" is attested from 1877.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
downturn (n.)

"a decline," 1926 in an economic sense, from the prepositional phrase; see down (adv.) + turn (n.).

Related entries & more 
inturn (n.)

1590s, "turning in of the toes" (especially in dancing), from in + turn. In wrestling, "a lifting with the thigh" (c. 1600).

Related entries & more 
turnkey (adj.)

1650s, "jailer," from turn (v.) + key (n.). In reference to a job that only has to be done only once, it is recorded from 1934. The notion probably is of something that can be accomplished with a single turn of a key.

Related entries & more 
turncoat (n.)

1550s, from turn (v.) + coat (n.). The image is of one who attempts to hide the badge of his party or leader. The expression to turn one's coat "change principles or party" is recorded from 1570s.

Related entries & more 
turnover (n.)

also turn-over, 1650s, "action of turning over," from the verbal phrase; see turn (v.) + over (adv.). As a kind of pastry tart, from 1798. Meaning "number of employees leaving a place and being replaced" is recorded from 1955.

Related entries & more 

Page 2