Etymology
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tail-end (n.)
late 14c., from tail (n.1) + end (n.).
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tail-pipe (n.)
also tailpipe, 1757, "small pipe fixed at the swell of a musket to receive the ramrod," from tail (n.1) + pipe (n.). From 1832 as "suction pipe of a pump;" 1907 as "exhaust pipe of an automobile."
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turn-off (n.)
"something that dampens one's spirits" recorded by 1971 (said to have been in use since 1968), from verbal phrase turn off "stop the flow of" (1850), from turn (v.) + off (adv.). Turn-off (n.) as "place where one road diverges from another" is from 1881.
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re-turn (v.)

late 14c., "turn (something) over or round or back," from re- "back, again" + turn (v.). Intransitive sense is from early 15c. Related: Re-turned; re-turning.

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U-turn (n.)
1934, from U + turn (n.). So called in reference to the shape of the path described.
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turn-around (n.)
also turnaround, 1936, from verbal phrase turn around "reverse," 1880, American English, from turn (v.) + around (adv.).
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coat-tail (n.)

c. 1600, "flaps formed by the lower back of a coat," from coat (n.) + tail (n.). In 17c., to do something on one's own coattail meant "at one's own expense." Meaning "power of one person," especially in politics, is at least from 1848 (in a Congressional speech by Abraham Lincoln); expression riding (someone's) coattails into political office is from 1949.

But the gentleman from Georgia further says we [Whigs] have deserted all our principles, and taken shelter under General Taylor's military coat-tail, and he seems to think this is exceedingly degrading. Well, as his faith is, so be it unto him. But can he remember no other military coat-tail under which a certain other party have been sheltering for near a quarter of a century? Has he no acquaintance with the ample military coat-tail of General Jackson? Does he not know that his own party have run the five last presidential races under that coat-tail? And that they are now running the sixth under the same cover? Yes, sir, that coat-tail was used not only for General Jackson himself, but has been clung to, with the grip of death, by every Democratic candidate since. [Lincoln, speech in Congress, July 27, 1848]
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fish-tail (n.)
1840, "the tail of a fish," from fish (n.) + tail (n.). As a verb, also fishtail, 1927, originally of aircraft, later automobiles. Related: Fishtailed; fishtailing.
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cotton-tail (n.)

also cottontail, by 1850, American English, a popular name, especially in the South, for the common rabbit of the U.S., so called for the conspicuous fluffy white fur on the underside of the tail; see cotton (n.) + tail (n.).

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high-tail (v.)
also hightail "move quickly," 1890, U.S. slang, from cattle ranches (animals fleeing with tails up); from high (adj.) + tail (n.). Related: Hightailed; hightailing.
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