Etymology
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tract (n.2)
"little book, treatise" mid-12c., probably a shortened form of Latin tractatus "a handling, treatise, treatment," from tractare "to handle" (see treat (v.)). Related: Tractarian.
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treaty (n.)
late 14c., "treatment, discussion," from Anglo-French treté, Old French traitié "assembly, agreement, dealings," from Latin tractatus "discussion, handling, management," from tractare "to handle, manage" (see treat (v.)). Sense of "contract or league between nations or sovereigns" is first recorded early 15c.
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entreat (v.)
c. 1400, "to enter into negotiations," especially "discuss or arrange peace terms;" also "to treat (someone) in a certain way," from Anglo-French entretier, Old French entraiter "to treat," from en- "make" (see en- (1)) + traiter "to treat" (see treat (v.)). Meaning "to beseech, implore, plead with (someone)" is from early 15c.; meaning "to plead for (someone)" is from mid-15c. Related: Entreated; entreating.
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baby (v.)
"to treat like a baby," 1742, from baby (n.). Related: Babied; babying.
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misuse (v.)

late 14c., misusen, "use or treat improperly;" from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + use (v.) and in part from Old French mesuser (Modern French méuser), from mis- (2). Meaning "abuse, treat badly, subject to ill-treatment" is attested from 1530s. Related: Misused; misusing; misusage.

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hop (v.2)
"treat with hops," 1570s (implied in hopped), from hop (n.1).
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-iatric 
word-forming element, from Latinized form of Greek iatrikos "healing," from iatros "physician, healer" (related to iatreun "treat medically," and iasthai "heal, treat"); of uncertain origin, perhaps from iaomai "to cure," related to iaino "heat, warm, cheer," probably from a root meaning "enliven, animate."
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trifle (v.)
"treat lightly," 1520s, from trifle (n.). Earlier "cheat, mock" (c. 1300). Related: Trifled; trifling.
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iodize (v.)
"add iodine to, treat with iodine," 1841, from iodine + -ize. Related: Iodized; iodizing.
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shaft (v.)
"treat cruelly and unfairly," by 1958, perhaps from shaft (n.1) with overtones of sodomy. Related: Shafted; shafting.
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