Etymology
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investigate (v.)

c. 1500, back-formation from investigation or else from Latin investigatus, past participle of investigare "to trace out, search after," figuratively "search into, investigate," from in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + vestigare "to track, trace," from vestigium "footprint, track" (see vestige). Related: Investigated; investigating.

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lineate (adj.)

"marked with lines," 1640s, from Latin lineatus, past participle of lineare in an unrecorded sense "trace lines" (see lineament).

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vestigial (adj.)

1850, "like a mere trace of what has been," originally in biology, from vestige + -al (1).

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investigation (n.)

early 15c., from Old French investigacion (14c.), from Latin investigationem (nominative investigatio) "a searching into, a searching for," noun of action from past participle stem of investigare "to trace out, search after," figuratively "search into, investigate," from in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + vestigare "to track, trace," from vestigium "a footprint, a track" (see vestige).

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soupcon (n.)

"a slight trace or suggestion," 1766, from French soupçon "suspicion," from Old French sospeçon "suspicion, worry, anxiety" (12c.), from Late Latin suspectionem (see suspicion).

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lineate (v.)

"to mark with lines," 1550s, from Latin lineatus, past participle of lineare in an unrecorded sense "trace lines" (see lineament). Related: Lineated; lineating.

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track (v.)

"to follow or trace the footsteps of," 1560s, from track (n.). Meaning "leave a footprint trail in dirt, mud, etc." is from 1838. Of film and TV cameras, 1959. Related: Tracked; tracking.

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originate (v.)

1650s, "to trace the origin of;" also "to bring into existence, give rise or origin to," probably a back-formation from origination. Intransitive sense of "to arise, come into existence" is from 1775. Related: Originated; originating.

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portray (v.)

mid-13c., portraien, "to draw, paint" (something), from Anglo-French purtraire, Old French portraire "to draw, to paint, portray" (12c.), literally "trace, draw forth," from por- "forth" (from Latin pro-; see pro-) + traire "trace, draw," from Latin trahere "to drag, draw" (see tract (n.1)). Meaning "depict in words, describe" is from late 14c. Related: Portrayed; portrayer; portraying.

Latin protrahere was "to draw forth" but in Medieval Latin also "to draw, paint."

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investigator (n.)

1550s, a native agent-noun formation from investigate, or else from Latin investigator "he that searches into," agent noun from past participle stem of investigare "to trace out, search after" (see investigation). Related: Investigatorial.

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