Etymology
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touchy (adj.)
"apt to take offense at slight provocation," c. 1600, perhaps an alteration of tetchy (q.v.) influenced by touch (v.). Related: Touchiness.
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touche 
exclamation acknowledging a hit in fencing, 1902, from French touché, past participle of toucher "to hit," from Old French touchier "to hit" (see touch (v.)). Extended (non-fencing) use by 1907.
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touchdown (n.)
1864, originally in rugby, where the ball is literally touched down on the other side of the goal, from verbal phrase (by 1859 in sports), from touch (v.) + down (adv.). As "landing of an aircraft" from 1935.
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untouched (adj.)
late 14c., "not been physically contacted," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of touch (v.). Meaning "unharmed, uninjured" is from c. 1400; that of "not used at all" is from 1530s; sense of "unmoved emotionally" is from 1610s.
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toccata (n.)
1724, from Italian toccata, from toccare "to touch," from Vulgar Latin *toccare (see touch (v.)). "A composition for a keyboard instrument, intended to exhibit the touch and technique of the performer, and having the air of an improvisation" [OED].
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touchstone (n.)
late 15c., from touch (v.) in the Middle English sense "to test" (metal) + stone (n.). Fine-grained black quartz, used for testing the quality of gold and silver alloys by the color of the streak made by rubbing them on it. Also see basalt. Figurative sense is from 1530s.
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retouch (v.)

"amend or improve by fresh touches," 1680s, from French retoucher (13c.) "to touch again" (with a view to improving), from re- "again" (see re-) + toucher (see touch (v.)). Related: Retouched; retouching; retoucher.

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untouchable (adj.)
1560s, "immaterial," from un- (1) "not" + touchable (see touch (v.)). Meaning "that legally cannot be interfered with" is recorded from 1734. Meaning "too loathsome or defiling to be touched" is recorded from 1873. The noun, in reference to a hereditary low caste of India, is attested from 1909; the term and the restrictions were made illegal in India in 1947.
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tocsin (n.)

"alarm bell," 1580s, from French toquassen "an alarm bell, the ringing of an alarm bell" (late 14c.), from Old Provençal tocasenh, from tocar "to strike" (from Vulgar Latin *toccare "strike a bell;" see touch (v.)) + senh "bell, bell note," from Late Latin signum "bell, ringing of a bell," in Latin "identifying mark, sign" (see sign (n.)). The current English spelling is from 1794, adopted from modern French.

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hyperaphia (n.)
"excessive sensitivity to touch," 1837, from German hyperaphia (1820s), from Greek aphe "touch;" also see hyper-. Related: hyperaphic "having morbid sensitiveness to touch" (1888).
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