Etymology
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attest (v.)

1590s, "bear witness to, officially confirm; give proof or evidence of," from French attester (Old French atester, 13c.) "affirm, bear witness to," from Latin attestari "confirm, prove," literally "bear witness to," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + testari "bear witness," from testis "witness" (see testament). Related: Attested; attesting.

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Barnard 

masc. proper name of Germanic origin, literally "Bear-bold;" see bear (n.) + hard (adj.). In Old French Bernart, in German Bernard.

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forbear (v.)

"to abstain," Old English forberan "bear up against, control one's feelings, abstain from, refrain; tolerate, endure" (past tense forbær, past participle forboren), from for- + beran "to bear" (see bear (v.)). Related: Forbearer; forbearing; forbore. Of similar formation are Old High German ferberen, Gothic frabairan "to endure."

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arctic (adj.)

late 14c., artik, "of or pertaining to the north pole of the heavens," from Old French artique and directly from Medieval Latin articus, from Latin arcticus, from Greek arktikos "of the north," literally "of the (constellation) Bear," from arktos "bear;" also "Ursa Major; the region of the north," the Bear being the best-known northern circumpolar constellation.

This is from *rkto-, the usual Indo-European root for "bear" (source also of Avestan aresho, Armenian arj, Albanian ari, Latin ursus, Welsh arth). For speculation on why Germanic lost the word, see bear (n.). The -c- was restored from 1550s.

It is attested from early 15c. as "northern;" from 1660s as "cold, frigid." As a noun, with capital A-, "the northern polar regions," from 1560s.

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intolerable (adj.)

late 14c., from Latin intolerabilis "that cannot bear; that cannot be borne," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + tolerabilis "that may be endured," from tolerare "to bear, endure" (see toleration). Related: Intolerably.

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fructify (v.)

mid-14c., "bear fruit," from Old French fructifiier "bear fruit, grow, develop" (12c.), from Late Latin fructificare "bear fruit," from Latin fructus "fruit, crops; profit, enjoyment" (from PIE root *bhrug- "to enjoy," with derivatives referring to agricultural products) + combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Transitive use from 1580s. Related: Fructified; fructifying; fructification.

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somniferous (adj.)

"sleep-producing," c. 1600, with -ous + Latin somnifer, from somni- "sleep" (from PIE root *swep- "to sleep") + ferre "to bear, carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children").

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bearable (adj.)

"endurable," mid-15c., from bear (v.) + -able. Related: Bearably.

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Osborn 

surname, also Osborne, Osbourn, Osbourne, etc., a Scandinavian name (Old Norse Asbiorn, Old Danish Asbiorn) meaning literally "god-bear," from os "a god" (see Oscar) + the Germanic word for "bear" (see bear (n.)). The name is found in England before the Conquest, perhaps directly from Scandinavia; it also was common in Normandy and was brought over from thence.

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