Etymology
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tit for tat 
1550s, possibly an alteration of tip for tap "blow for blow," from tip (v.3) "tap" + tap "touch lightly." Perhaps influenced by tit (n.2).
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tipsy (adj.)
1570s, from tip (v.1); compare drowsy, flimsy, tricksy. Later associated with tipple. Tipsy-cake (1806) was stale cake saturated with wine or liquor.
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tipstaff (n.)
1540s, "tipped staff" (truncheon with a tip or cap of metal) carried as an emblem of office, from tip (n.) + staff (n.). As the name of an official who carries one (especially a sheriff's officer, bailiff, constable, court crier, etc.) it is recorded from 1560s.
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tiptoe (n.)
late 14c., from tip (n.1) + toe (n.). As an adverb from 1590s; as a verb from 1630s. Related: Tiptoes (late 14c.), also tiptoon; tip-toed. Tippy-toes is from 1820.
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wingtip (n.)
also wing-tip, 1867, "tip of a wing" (originally of insects; by 1870 of birds), from wing (n.) + tip (n.1). Of airplane wings from 1909. As a type of shoe with a back-curving toe cap suggestive of a bird's wingtip, from 1928. Related: Wing-tipped.
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apex (n.)
"the tip, point, or summit" of anything, c. 1600, from Latin apex "summit, peak, tip, top, extreme end;" probably related to apere "to fasten, fix," hence "the tip of anything" (one of the meanings in Latin was "small rod at the top of the flamen's cap"), from PIE *ap- (1) "to take, reach" (see apt). Proper plural is apices.
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tilt (v.1)
Old English *tyltan "to be unsteady," from tealt "unsteady," from Proto-Germanic *taltaz (source also of Old Norse tyllast "to trip," Swedish tulta "to waddle," Norwegian tylta "to walk on tip-toe," Middle Dutch touteren "to swing"). Meaning "to cause to lean, tip, slope" (1590s) is from sense of "push or fall over." Intransitive sense "to lean, tip" first recorded 1620s. Related: Tilted; tilting.
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pug-nose (n.)

"a nose turned upwards at the tip," 1778, from pug (n.) based on fancied similarity to the nose of either the monkey or the dog. Related: Pug-nosed (1791). Pug-face is attested by 1768.

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topple (v.)
1580s, "tumble down, fall headfirst," earlier "tumble or roll about" (1540s), from top (v.) "to tip" + frequentative suffix -le. Transitive sense also is from 1590s. Related: Toppled; toppling.
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hunch (n.)
1620s, "a push, thrust," from hunch (v.) in its older sense. Figurative sense of "a hint, a tip" (a "push" toward a solution or answer), first recorded 1849, led to that of "premonition, presentiment" (1904).
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