Etymology
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full-time (adj.)
also fulltime, 1895; full-timer is attested from 1855, in reference to students; see full (adj.) + time (n.).
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time-honored (adj.)
also time-honoured, 1590s; from time (n.) + past participle of honor (v.).
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time-stamp (n.)
1888, from time (n.) + stamp (n.). As a verb by 1906. Related: Time-stamped.
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run-time (n.)

"length of time taken in a particular task," 1974, originally in computing; see run (v.) + time (n.). In computing, run (n.) "instance of execution of a program" is by 1946.

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time-server (n.)
"one who adapts his manners and opinions to the times," 1580s, from expression serve the time "shape one's views to what is in favor" (1550s), translating Latin tempori servire. See time (n.) + serve (v.).
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time-out (n.)
also time out, 1896 in sports, 1939 in other occupations; from 1980 as the name of a strategy in child discipline; from time + out.
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half-time (n.)
also halftime, half time, indicating "half of the time," 1640s, from half + time (n.). Tempo sense is by 1880. In football, from 1867.
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part-time (adj.)

also parttime, "employed, occurring, or lasting for less than the usual time," 1891, from part (n.) + time (n.). Related: Part-timer.

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good-time (adj.)
1928, from the noun phrase, from good (adj.) + time (n.). Expression to have a good time "enjoy oneself" attested from 1822; earlier have a good time of it (1771). To make good time "go fast" is from 1838. In Middle English, good time was "prosperous time," also "high time" (that something be done).
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night-time (n.)

also nighttime, "the hours of darkness," late 13c., from night + time (n.). In the same sense Middle English had also nighter-tale (c. 1300), probably based on Old Norse nattar-þel.

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