Etymology
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logger (n.1)
"one who fells or cuts trees, one employed in getting out timber from forests," by 1708, agent noun from log (v.1).
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shore (v.)
mid-14c., "to prop, support with a prop;" of obscure etymology though widespread in Germanic (Middle Dutch schooren "to prop up, support," Old Norse skorða (n.) "a piece of timber set up as a support"). Related: Shored; shoring. Also as a noun, "post or beam for temporary support of something" (mid-15c.), especially an oblique timber to brace the side of a building or excavation.
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wormhole (n.)
also worm-hole, 1590s, "hole made by a burrowing insect" (in fruit, timber, etc.), from worm (n.) + hole (n.). Astrophysics sense is attested from 1957.
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holt (n.)

Old English holt "woods, forest, grove, thicket," common in place names, from Proto-Germanic *hultam- (source also of Old Frisian, Old Norse, Middle Dutch holt, Dutch hout, German Holz "a wood, wood as timber"), from PIE *kldo- (source also of Old Church Slavonic klada "beam, timber;" Russian koloda, Lithuanian kalada "block of wood, log;" Greek klados "twig;" Old Irish caill "wood"), from root *kel- "to strike, cut."

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dry rot (n.)

"fungal decay in timber," by 1779, from dry (adj.) + rot (n.). Figurative sense of "concealed or unsuspected inward degeneration" is by 1821.

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rough-hewn (adj.)

1520s, originally of timber, from verbal phrase rough hew "to hew coarsely without smoothing" (1520s); see rough (adj.) + hew (v.).

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rafter (n.2)

1809, "one employed in rafting timber," agent noun from raft (v.). By 1978 as "one who uses a recreational raft."

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sawmill (n.)

"mill (originally driven by water or wind) for sawing timber into boards and planks," 1550s; see saw (n.1) + mill (n.1).

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dendro- 

word-forming element meaning "tree," from Greek dendron "tree," sometimes especially "fruit tree" (as opposed to hylē "timber"), from PIE *der-drew-, from root *deru- "to be firm, solid, steadfast," also forming words for "wood, tree."

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sprocket (n.)
1530s, originally a carpenters' word for a piece of timber used in framing, of unknown origin. The meaning "projection from the rim of a wheel that engages the links of a chain" is first recorded 1750.
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