Etymology
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thrice (adv.)
c. 1200, from Old English þriga, þriwa "thrice" (from þrie "three;" see three) + adverbial genitive -es, changed c. 1600 to -ce to reflect voiceless pronunciation.
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sitar (n.)
1845, from Hindi sitar, from Persian sitar "three-stringed," from si "three" (Old Persian thri-; see three) + tar "string," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."
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tri- 
word-forming element meaning "three, having three, once every three," from Latin tres (neuter tria) or Greek treis, trias "three" (see three).
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trivet (n.)
three-legged iron stand, 12c., trefet, probably from a noun use of Latin tripedem (nominative tripes) "three-footed," from tri- "three" (see three) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").
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ternary (adj.)
"threefold," early 15c., from Late Latin ternarius "consisting of three," from terni "three by three," from ter "thrice," which is related to tres "three" (see three).
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triad (n.)
1540s, "group or set of three," from Late Latin trias (genitive triadis), from Greek trias (genitive triados) "a triad, the number three," from treis "three" (see three). Musical sense of "chord of three notes" is from 1801. Related: Triadic.
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triumvirate (n.)
1580s, from Latin triumviratus, from triumvir, from Old Latin phrase trium virum, genitive plural of tres viri "three men," from tres "three" (see three) + viri, plural of vir "man" (from PIE root *wi-ro- "man").
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troika (n.)
1842, "carriage drawn by three horses abreast," from Russian troika "three-horse team, any group of three," from collective numeral troje "group of three" (from PIE *tro-yo-, suffixed form of *trei-, see three) + diminutive suffix -ka. Sense of "any group of three administrators, triumvirate" is first recorded 1945.
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trey (n.)
late 14c., "card, die, or domino with three spots," from Anglo-French, Old French treis (Modern French trois), oblique case of treie "three," from Latin tria (neuter) "three" (see three). In slang use for "three (of anything)" from 1887.
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triceratops (n.)

dinosaur genus, 1890, from Greek trikeratos "three-horned" + ōps "face," etymologically "eye," from PIE root *okw- "to see." The first element is from tri- "three" (see three) + keras (genitive keratos) "horn of an animal," from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head."

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