Etymology
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lisle (n.)
in reference to fabric, thread, etc., 1851, from French Lisle, earlier spelling of Lille, city in northwest France where the thread was made. The name is apparently originally l'isle "the island," referring to its location.
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file (v.1)

"place (papers) in consecutive order for future reference," mid-15c., from Old French filer "string documents on a thread or wire for preservation or reference" (15c.), earlier "to spin thread," from fil "thread, string" (12c.), from Latin filum "a thread, string; thread of fate; cord, filament," from PIE *gwhis-lom, suffixed form of root *gwhi- "thread, tendon." The notion is of documents hung up on a line in consecutive order for ease of reference.

File (filacium) is a threed or wyer, whereon writs, or other exhibits in courts, are fastened for the better keeping of them. [Cowel, "The Interpreter," 1607]

Methods have become more sophisticated, but the word has stuck. Meaning "place among the records of a court or office" is from 1510s; of newspaper reporters sending in stories, 1954. Intransitive sense "march in a line (as soldiers do) one after another" is from 1610s. Related: Filed; filing.

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twill (n.)

"cloth woven in parallel diagonal lines," early 14c., Scottish and northern English variant of Middle English twile, from Old English twili "woven with double thread, twilled," partial loan-translation of Latin bilix "with a double thread" (with Old English twi- substituted for cognate Latin bi-, both from PIE root *dwo- "two"); the second element from Latin licium "thread," a word of unknown etymology. 

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fillet (n.)
early 14c., "little headband," from Old French filet "thread, filament; strip, ligament" (12c.), diminutive of fil "thread" (see file (v.1)). Sense of "cut of meat or fish" is from late 14c., apparently so called because it was prepared by being tied up with a string.
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pinworm (n.)

also pin-worm, "small, thread-like worm," by 1837, from pin (n.) + worm (n.).

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nematocyst (n.)

"thread cell, lasso cell," such as the stinging organs of jellyfish, 1875, from nemato- + cyst. Related: Nematocystic.

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spinner (n.)
early 13c., "spider," agent noun from spin (v.). Meaning "person who spins textile thread" is from late 14c.
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nematode (n.)

a thread-worm, roundworm, pin-worm, etc., 1865, from Modern Latin Nematoda, the class or phylum name.

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twister (n.)
late 15c., "one who spins thread," agent noun from twist (v.). Meaning "tornado" is attested from 1881, American English.
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clew (n.)

"ball of thread or yarn," northern English and Scottish relic of Old English cliewen "sphere, ball, skein, ball of thread or yarn," probably from West Germanic *kleuwin (source also of Old Saxon cleuwin, Dutch kluwen), from Proto-Germanic *kliwjo-, perhaps from a PIE *gleu- "gather into a mass, conglomerate," from the source of clay (q.v.). For further sense evolution, see clue (n.).

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