Etymology
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cladism (n.)

"theory or practice of cladistic taxonomy," 1966, from clade + -ism. Related: Cladist.

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hot-blooded (adj.)

"passionate," 1590s; a relic of old medicine and medieval physiology theory; see hot (adj.) + blood (n.).

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voluntarism (n.)
1838, "theory or principal of using voluntary action rather than coercion (in politics, religion, etc.), from voluntary + -ism. (Voluntaryism in the religious sense, as opposed to establishmentarianism, is recorded from 1835.) In philosophy, "theory that the will is the basic principle," 1896, from German Voluntarismus (Tönnies, 1883).
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anthropocentrism (n.)

"system or theory that regards human beings as the central fact of creation," 1897; see anthropocentric + -ism.

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constitutionalism (n.)

1832, "the theory or principle of a constitutional system of government;" occasionally also "constitutionality, adherence to constitutional government;" from constitutional (adj.) + -ism. Related: Constitutionalist (1766).

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biogenic (adj.)
1864, "produced by living organisms," from bio- + -genic "produced by." From 1904 with reference to Haeckel's recapitulation theory, from biogeny + -ic.
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anti-bacterial (adj.)

also antibacterial, 1875, from anti- + bacterial. Originally "opposed to the theory that certain diseases are caused by bacteria;" later as "destructive to bacteria" (by 1897).  

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racialist (n.)

"a racist, an advocate of racial theory, a believer in the superiority of a particular race," 1910, from racial + -ist. Also see racist. As an adjective from 1917.

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relativity (n.)

1834, "fact or condition of being relative, existence as an immediate object of the understanding or experience, existence only in relation to a thinking mind," (apparently coined by Coleridge, in "Notes on Waterland's Vindication of Christ's Divinity"), from relative (adj.) + -ity. In scientific use, connected to the theory of Albert Einstein (1879-1955) having to do with the dependence of observation on the relative motion of observer and object, published in 1905 (special theory of relativity) and 1915 (general theory of relativity), but the word was used in roughly this sense by J.C. Maxwell in 1876. An earlier noun in the sense of "state of being relative" was relativeness (1670s).

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dietician (n.)

"one who practices some theory of diet," 1845, from diet (n.1) on model of physician. Earlier was dietist (c. 1600).

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