Etymology
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fable (n.)
c. 1300, "falsehood, fictitious narrative; a lie, pretense," from Old French fable "story, fable, tale; drama, play, fiction; lie, falsehood" (12c.), from Latin fabula "story, story with a lesson, tale, narrative, account; the common talk, news," literally "that which is told," from fari "speak, tell," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say." Restricted sense of "animal story" (early 14c.) comes from Aesop. In modern folklore terms, defined as "a short, comic tale making a moral point about human nature, usually through animal characters behaving in human ways" ["Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore"].
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rapportage (n.)

"the describing of events in writing," 1898, a French word in English, from French rapportage, literally "tale-telling," from rapporter "to bring back; refer to" (see rapport).

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duckling (n.)

"a young duck," early 15c., from duck (n.1) + -ling. The ugly duckling is from Hans Christian Andersen's tale (1843 in Danish, by 1846 in English).

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night-time (n.)

also nighttime, "the hours of darkness," late 13c., from night + time (n.). In the same sense Middle English also had nighter-tale (c. 1300), probably based on Old Norse nattar-þel.

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Haggadah (n.)
"saying in the Talmud illustrative of the law," 1856, from Rabbinical Hebrew haggadhah, literally "tale," verbal noun from higgidh "to make clear, narrate, expound." Plural Haggadoth. Related: Haggadic.
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jest (v.)
1520s, "to speak in a trifling manner;" 1550s, "to joke, say or do something meant to amuse," from Middle English gesten "recite a tale" (late 14c.), from geste "action, exploit" (see jest (n.)). Related: Jested; jesting.
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trifle (n.)
c. 1200, trufle "false or idle tale," later "matter of little importance" (c. 1300), from Old French trufle "mockery," diminutive of truffe "deception," of uncertain origin. As a type of light confection from 1755.
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unblown (adj.)

"not yet bloomed," 1580s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of blow (v.2).

Life is the rose's hope while yet unblown;
The reading of an ever-changing tale;
[Keats, from "Sleep and Poetry"]
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fabulist (n.)
1590s, "inventor or writer of fables," from French fabuliste, from Latin fabula "story, tale" (see fable (n.)). The earlier word in English was fabler (late 14c.); the Latin term was fabulator.
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Rip Van Winkle 

"person out of touch with current conditions," 1829, the name of the character in Washington Irving's popular Catskills tale (published 1819) of the henpecked husband who sleeps enchanted for 20 years and finds the world has forgotten him.

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