Etymology
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multitasking (n.)

also multi-tasking, "concurrent execution of a number of different activities," 1966, originally in computing, from multi- "many" + tasking (see task (n.)). Of humans, by 1998. Related: Multitask (v.), by 1987. As an adjective, multi-task is recorded from 1954 in a non-computer mechanical context.

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run-time (n.)

"length of time taken in a particular task," 1974, originally in computing; see run (v.) + time (n.). In computing, run (n.) "instance of execution of a program" is by 1946.

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hoe (v.)
early 15c., "to clear weeds with a hoe," from hoe (n.). Tedious and toilsome work, hence a hard (or long) row to hoe "a difficult task;" hoe (one's) own row "tend to one's affairs." Related: Hoed; hoeing.
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game (adj.2)
"ready for action, unafraid, and up to the task;" probably literally "spirited as a game-cock," 1725, from game-cock "bird bred for fighting" (1670s), from game (n.) in the "sport, amusement" sense. Middle English adjectives gamesome, gamelich meant "joyful, playful, sportive."
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metier (n.)

"one's skill, talent, or calling," 1792, from French métier "trade, profession," from Old French mestier "task, affair, service, function, duty," from Gallo-Roman *misterium, from Latin ministerium "office, service," from minister "servant" (see minister (n.)).

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onus (n.)

"a burden," 1640s, from Latin onus "load, burden," figuratively "tax, expense; trouble, difficulty," from PIE *en-es- "burden" (source of Sanskrit anah "cart, wagon"). Hence legal Latin onus probandi (1722) "the task of proving what has been alleged," literally "burden of proving."

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accomplishment (n.)
early 15c., "performance of a task; state of completion," from Old French acomplissement "completion, action of accomplishing," from acomplir "to fulfill, carry out, complete" (see accomplish). Meaning "thing completed" and that of "something that completes" someone and fits him or her for cultivated or fashionable society are from c. 1600.
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subsume (v.)

1530s, from Modern Latin subsumere "to take under," from Latin sub "under" (see sub-) + sumere "to take, obtain, buy," from sus‑, variant of sub‑ "up from under" + emere "to take" (from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute"). Related: Subsumed; subsuming, subsumption.

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unequal (adj.)
1530s, "unjust, unfair," from un- (1) "not" + equal (adj.). Meaning "not the same in amount, size, quality, etc." is recorded from 1560s (inequal in this sense is from late 14c.). Sense of "inadequate, insufficient" (to some task) is attested from 1690s. Related: Unequally.
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assignment (n.)
late 14c., "an order, request, directive," from Old French assignement "(legal) assignment (of dower, etc.)," from Late Latin assignamentum, noun of action from Latin assignare/adsignare "to allot, assign, award" (see assign). Meaning "appointment to office" is mid-15c.; that of "a task assigned (to someone), commission" is by 1848.
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