Etymology
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all-over (adj.)
"covering every part," 1859, from the adverbial phrase; see all + over (adv.). As a noun, by 1838 as the trade name for a button, etc., gilded on both sides rather than only the top. All-overish "generally, indefinitely indisposed" is from 1820. Related: All-overishness.
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over-age (adj.)

that is over a certain age," "1886, from over- + age (n.). Related: Over-aged (n.) "those who are too old" (late 15c.).

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stop-over (n.)
also stopover, 1881, from the verbal phrase, from stop (v.) + over (adv.).
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once-over (n.)

"glance, rapid inspection," 1913, American English, from once + over.

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going-over (n.)
1872 as "scolding;" 1919 as "inspection;" from verbal phrase; see going + over (adv.).
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change-over (n.)

"alteration from one system to another," 1907, from the verbal phrase; see change (v.) + over (adv.).

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takeover (n.)
1917, "an act of taking over," from verbal phrase take over (1884), from take (v.) + over (adv.). Attested from 1958 in the corporate sense.
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overextend (v.)

also over-extend, "to take on too much" (work, debt, etc.), 1937, from over- + extend. Related: Overextended; overextending.

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betake (v.)
c. 1200, "to hand over," from be- + take (v.). From the beginning confused in form and sense with the older beteach. From c. 1400 in the etymologically proper sense "to take, accept." Its reflexive sense "take oneself" (to) emerged mid-15c. Related: Betook; betaken.
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overtake (v.)

"to come up to, catch up with, catch in pursuit," early 13c., from over- + take (v.). According to OED, originally "the running down and catching of a fugitive or beast of chase"; the editors find the sense of over- in this word "not so clear." The meaning "take by surprise, come on unexpectedly" (of storms, night, misfortune) is from late 14c. Related: Overtaken; overtaking. Old English had oferniman "to take away, carry off, seize, ravish."

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