Etymology
Advertisement
hard-on (n.)
"penile erection," 1922, earlier as an adjective (1893), from hard + on.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
add-on (n.)
"additional component," 1941, from verbal phrase add on; see add (v.) + on (adv.).
Related entries & more 
walk-on (n.)
"minor non-speaking role," 1902, theatrical slang, from the verbal phrase walk on, attested in theater jargon by 1897 with a sense "appear in crowd scenes," from walk (v.) + on (adv.). Meaning "actor who has such a part" is attested from 1946. The sports team sense is recorded from 1974.
Related entries & more 
on-site (adj.)
also onsite, 1959, from on + site. Originally in reference to Cold War military inspections.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
put-on (n.)

"ruse, deception," 1937, from earlier adjectival meaning "assumed, feigned" (1620s), a figurative extension of the verbal phrase on the notion of putting on costumes or disguises. To put on (v.), of clothes, garments, etc., is by early 15c.; see from put (v.) + on (adv.). Hence "clothe, cover, assume as covering" (mid-15c.) and "assume the garb or appearance of" (real or feigned), 1520s. The expression put (someone) on "play a trick on, deceive" (by 1958) seems to be a back-formation from the noun.

Related entries & more 
carry on (v.)
1640s, "continue to advance," also "manage, be engaged in," from carry (v.) + on (adv.). Meaning "conduct oneself in a wild and thoughtless manner" is by 1828. Carryings-on is from 1660s as "questionable doings," from 1866 as "riotous behavior." As an adjective, carry-on, in reference to luggage that may be brought into the passenger compartment of an airliner, by 1965.
Related entries & more 
turn-on (n.)
that which arouses or excites, 1968, originally of psychedelic drugs, from verbal phrase turn on "activate (a mechanism)" (1833), specifically from figurative sense turn (someone) on "excite, stimulate, arouse," recorded from 1903; from turn (v.) + on (adv.).
Related entries & more 
iron-on (adj.)
1959, from the verbal phrase, from iron (v.) + on (adv.).
Related entries & more 
get on (v.)
1590s, "to put on," from get (v.) + on (adv.). Meaning "prosper" is from 1785; that of "to advance, make progress" is from 1798; that of "be friendly" (with) is attested by 1816.
Related entries & more 

Page 2