Etymology
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sweetmeat (n.)
"a sweet thing to eat," Old English swete mete; see sweet (adj.) + meat (n.).
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sweetbread (n.)
"pancreas of an animal used as food" 1560s, from sweet (adj.); the -bread element may be from Old English bræd "flesh."
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semisweet (adj.)

also semi-sweet, "partially sweetened; somewhat sweet," 1943, from semi- + sweet (adj.).

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twee (adj.)
"tiny, dainty, miniature," 1905, from childish pronunciation of sweet (adj.). Compare tummy from stomach.
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sweetheart (n.)
late 13c. as a form of address, 1570s as a synonym for "loved one;" from sweet (adj.) + heart (n.). As an adjective, with reference to labor contracts, it is attested from 1959.
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sweeten (v.)
1550s (intransitive), from sweet (adj.) + verbal ending -en (1). Transitive sense ("become sweet") is from 1620s. The Middle English form of the verb was simply sweet, from Old English swetan. Related: Sweetened; sweetening.
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suave (adj.)
early 15c., "gracious, kindly, pleasant, delightful," from Latin suavis "agreeable, sweet, pleasant (to the senses), delightful," from PIE root *swād- "sweet, pleasant" (see sweet (adj.)). In reference to persons, sense of "smoothly agreeable" first recorded 1815 (implied in suavity). Related: Suavely.
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toot sweet (adv.)
"right away, promptly," 1917, American English, representing U.S. soldiers' mangled adaptation of French tout de suite.
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Sweet Adeline 
female barbershop singing group member, 1947, from the name of a popular close harmony song by Richard Armstrong & Harry Gerard, "You're the Flower of my Heart, Sweet Adeline" (1903).
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bittersweet (adj.)
"uniting bitterness and sweetness," 1610s, from bitter (adj.) + sweet (adj.). Perhaps older, as the same word is used as a noun in Middle English (late 14c.) for drinks or experiences that are both bitter and sweet and especially in reference to a type of apple; later of woody nightshade (1560s). Greek had a similarly formed compound, glykypikros, literally "sweet-bitter."
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