Etymology
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cogito ergo sum 

Latin phrase, literally "I think, therefore I am;" the starting point of Cartesian philosophy (see Cartesian), from cogito, first person singular present indicative active of cogitare "to think" (see cogitation) + ergo "therefore" (see ergo) + sum, first person singular present indicative of esse "to be" (from PIE root *es- "to be").

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consomme (n.)

1815, "strong, clear soup containing juices of meat extracted by long cooking," from French consommé, noun use of past participle of consommer "to consume" (12c.), from Latin consummare "to complete, finish, perfect," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see com-) + summa "sum, total," from summus "highest" (see sum (n.)). The French verb was influenced in sense by consummer, from Latin consumere "to consume."

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*uper 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "over."

It forms all or part of: hyper-; insuperable; over; over-; sirloin; somersault; soprano; soubrette; sovereign; sum; summit; super-; superable; superb; superior; supernal; supra-; supreme; sur-.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit upari, Avestan upairi "over, above, beyond;" Greek hyper, Latin super "above, over;" Old English ofer "over," German über, Gothic ufaro "over, across;" Gaulish ver-, Old Irish for.
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summate (v.)
"to add, combine," 1900, from Medieval Latin summatus, past participle of summare "to sum" (see summation). Related: Summated; summating.
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summit (n.)

c. 1400, "highest point, peak," from Old French somete "summit, top," diminutive of som, sum "highest part, top of a hill," from Latin summum, neuter of noun use of summus "highest," related to super "over" (from PIE root *uper "over"). The meaning "meeting of heads of state" (1950) is from Winston Churchill's metaphor of "a parley at the summit."

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resultant (n.)

mid-15c., in mathematics, "the total or sum, the sum of an addition or product of a multiplication," from Medieval Latin resultantem (nominative resultans), present participle of resultare "to result" (see result (v.)). Sense in mechanics is from 1815.

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total (n.)
"whole amount, sum," 1550s, from total (adj.).
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someone (pron.)
c. 1300, sum on; from some + one. Someone else "romantic rival" is from 1914.
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amount (n.)
"quantity, sum," 1710, from amount (v.). As nouns, Middle English had amountance, amountment.
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long (n.)
in long and short of it "the sum of the matter in a few words," c. 1500, from long (adj.).
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