Etymology
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pissy (adj.)

"of or pertaining to piss," 1926, from piss (n.) + -y (2). Figurative use as a general term of abuse is by 1972.

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abusive (adj.)
Origin and meaning of abusive

1530s (implied in abusively) "improper," from French abusif, from Latin abusivus "misapplied, improper," from abus-, past-participle stem of abuti "misuse," literally "use up" (see abuse (v.)). Meaning "full of abuse" is from 1580s. Shakespeare has abusious ("Taming of the Shrew," 1594). Abuseful "abounding in reproaches" was in use 17c.-19c. Related: Abusively; abusiveness.

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maltreat (v.)

"to treat ill, abuse," 1708, from French maltraiter, or formed in English from mal- + treat (v.). Related: Maltreated; maltreating.

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crone (n.)

late 14c., "a feeble and withered old woman," in Middle English a strong term of abuse, from Anglo-French carogne "carrion, carcass; an old ewe," also a term of abuse, from Old North French carogne, Old French charogne, term of abuse for a cantankerous or withered woman, also "old sheep," literally "carrion," from Vulgar Latin *caronia (see carrion).

Perhaps the "old ewe" sense is older than the "old woman" one in French, but the former is attested in English only from 16c. Since mid-20c. the word has been somewhat reclaimed in feminism and neo-paganism as a symbol of mature female wisdom and power.

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mistreatment (n.)

"abuse, wrong or unkind treatment," 1716, from mistreat + -ment. The earlier noun was mistreating (mid-15c.).

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transubstantiation (n.)

late 14c., "change of one substance to another," from Medieval Latin trans(s)ubstantiationem (nominative trans(s)ubstantio), noun of action from past participle stem of trans(s)ubstantiare "to change from one substance into another," from Latin trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + substantiare "to substantiate," from substania "substance" (see substance). Ecclesiastical sense in reference to the Eucharist first recorded 1530s.

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pillory (v.)

c. 1600, "punish by exposure in the pillory," from pillory (n.). Figurative sense of "expose publicly to ridicule, contempt, or abuse" is from 1690s. Related: Pilloried.

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reagent (n.)

1785, originally in chemistry, "a substance used to effect chemical change in another substance to render its nature more evident," from re- + agent (n.) "substance that produces a chemical reaction."

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insubstantial (adj.)

c. 1600, from Medieval Latin insubstantialis "not substantial," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Late Latin substantialis "having substance or reality, material," in Late Latin "pertaining to the substance or essence," from substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). Related: Insubstantially.

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consubstantial (adj.)

"having the same substance or essence," late 14c., a term in the theology of the Trinity, from Church Latin consubstantialis "of like essence, nature, or substance," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). In general use from 1570s. Related: Consubstantially; consubstantiality; consubstantialism.

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