Etymology
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raisonne (adj.)

"reasoned out, arranged logically," 1777, from French raisonné "reasoned," past participle of raisonner "to reason," from raison "course; matter; subject; language, speech; thought, opinion," from Latin rationem (nominative ratio) "reckoning, understanding, motive, cause," from ratus, past participle of reri "to reckon, think" (from PIE root *re- "to reason, count").

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antimatter (n.)

also anti-matter, type of matter not existing in a stable form in this universe, 1898, from anti- "opposite" + matter (n.).

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argument (n.)

early 14c., "statements and reasoning in support of a proposition or causing belief in a doubtful matter," from Old French arguement "reasoning, opinion; accusation, charge" (13c.), from Latin argumentum "a logical argument; evidence, ground, support, proof," from arguere "make clear, make known, prove" (see argue). The sense in English passed through "subject of contention" (1590s) to "a quarrel" (by 1911), a sense formerly attached to argumentation.

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subsistence (n.)

early 15c., "existence, independence," from Late Latin subsistentia "substance, reality," in Medieval Latin also "stability," from Latin subsistens, present participle of subsistere "stand still or firm" (see subsist). Latin subsistentia is a loan-translation of Greek hypostasis "foundation, substance, real nature, subject matter; that which settles at the bottom, sediment," literally "anything set under." In the English word, meaning "act or process of support for physical life" is from 1640s.

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topic (n.)

1630s, "a class of considerations from which probable arguments can be drawn," singular form of "Topics" (1560s), the name of a work by Aristotle on logical and rhetorical generalities, from Latin Topica, from Greek Ta Topika, literally "matters concerning topoi," "commonplaces," neuter plural of noun use of topikos "pertaining to a common place, of a place, local," from topos "place" (see topos). The meaning "matter treated in speech or writing, subject, theme" is first recorded 1720.

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materiality (n.)

1520s, "that which is the matter of something, material substance," from Modern Latin materialitas, from materialis "of or belonging to matter," from Latin materia "matter, stuff" (see matter (n.)). From 1560s as "state or quality of being material;" 1640s as "quality of being important to matters at hand, essentiality."

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taxable (adj.)

"subject to taxation," late 15c., from Anglo-French taxable, Anglo-Latin taxabilis; see tax (v.) + -able. As a noun meaning "person subject to taxation" from 1660s.

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dutiable (adj.)

"subject to a customs duty," 1774, from duty + -able.

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subjectify (v.)

1858, from subject (n.) + -ify. Related: Subjectified; subjectifying.

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rottenness (n.)

"state of being decayed or putrid, process of natural decomposition of animal or vegetable matter," mid-14c., from rotten + -ness. From c. 1400 as "decayed or decaying matter."

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