Etymology
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gunshot (n.)

also gun-shot, early 15c., "the firing of a gun," from gun (n.) + shot (n.). Meaning "range of a gun or cannon" is from 1530s.

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gunfight (n.)

also gun-fight, a combat with handguns, 1889, American English, from gun (n.) + fight (n.). Related: Gunfighter.

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stunner (n.)

1829, in pugilism, agent noun from stun. Meaning "beautiful woman" attested by 1848 on notion of "one who astounds or amazes."

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gunplay (n.)

also gun-play, 1891, from gun (n.) + play (n.).

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stunning (adj.)

1660s, "dazzling," present-participle adjective from stun (v.). Popularized for "splendid, excellent" c. 1849. Related: Stunningly.

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gunsmith (n.)

1580s, from gun (n.) + smith (n.). Middle English had gun-maker (late 14c.).

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gunnery (n.)

c. 1600, "science of gun-making," from gun + -ery. Meaning "science of firing guns" is from 1816.

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gat (n.)

"revolver," 1904, slang shortening of Gatling gun; by 1880, gatlin was slang for a gun of any sort.

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Bren 

type of machine gun used by the British army in World War II, 1937, short for Bren gun, coined from first letters of Brno, Czechoslovakia, and Enfield, near London. The patent was purchased in Brno, and the gun was manufactured in Enfield.

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misfire (v.)

1752, of a gun, "to fail in firing;" by 1893 of an internal combustion engine; see mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + fire (v.). Perhaps the first element is miss (v.); to miss fire, of a gun, is attested by 1727. Related: Misfired; misfiring. Figurative use by 1942. The noun is attested from 1839 in reference to a gun or cannon.

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