Etymology
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blow-gun (n.)
"pipe or tube through which missiles are blown by the breath," 1799, from blow (v.1) + gun (n.).
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pop-gun (n.)

type of child's toy, 1620s, from pop (n.1) + gun (n.). So called from the sound of the compressed air released when it is fired.

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sub-machine-gun (n.)

"light, portable machine gun," 1926, from sub- + machine-gun (n.).

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gunshot (n.)
also gun-shot, early 15c., "the firing of a gun," from gun (n.) + shot (n.). Meaning "range of a gun or cannon" is from 1530s.
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stunner (n.)
1829, in pugilism, agent noun from stun. Meaning "beautiful woman" attested by 1848 on notion of "one who astounds or amazes."
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gunfight (n.)
also gun-fight, a combat with handguns, 1889, American English, from gun (n.) + fight (n.). Related: Gunfighter.
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gunplay (n.)
also gun-play, 1891, from gun (n.) + play (n.).
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gunsmith (n.)
1580s, from gun (n.) + smith (n.). Middle English had gun-maker (late 14c.).
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stunning (adj.)
1660s, "dazzling," present-participle adjective from stun (v.). Popularized for "splendid, excellent" c. 1849. Related: Stunningly.
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gunnery (n.)
c. 1600, "science of gun-making," from gun + -ery. Meaning "science of firing guns" is from 1816.
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