Etymology
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tour de force (n.)
"feat of strength," 1802, French; see tour (n.) + force (n.).
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Etheldred 
Anglo-Saxon fem. proper name, Old English Æðelðryð, literally "of noble strength" (see Audrey).
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athleticism (n.)
1835, "devotion to athletics," from athletic + -ism. Also, by late 19c., "physical strength and capability of robust activity."
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titration (n.)
in chemistry, "the establishment of a standard strength or degree of concentration of a solution," 1864, noun of action from titrate (v.).
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nerveless (adj.)

"destitute of strength, weak, characterized by lack of energy," 1735; see nerve (n.) + -less. Related: Nervelessness.

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pancratium (n.)

in ancient Greece, a contest combining wrestling and boxing, c. 1600, from Latinized form of Greek pankration, literally "complete contest," from pan- "all" (see pan-) + kratos "strength," from PIE *kre-tes- "power, strength," suffixed form of root *kar- "hard."  

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debilitate (v.)

"weaken, impair the strength of, enfeeble, make inactive or languid," 1530s, from Latin debilitatus, past participle of debilitare "to weaken," from debilis "weak, helpless," from de "from, away" (see de-) + -bilis "strength," from PIE root *bel- "strong" (see Bolshevik). Related: Debilitated; debilitating.

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amperage (n.)
strength of an electric current, 1889, from ampere on model of voltage; see -age.
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Gaza 
Arabic form of Hebrew 'az "force, strength." Gaza Strip was created by the division of 1949.
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unnerve (v.)
1620s, "to destroy the strength of," from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + nerve (v.). Meaning "to deprive of courage" is recorded from 1704. Related: Unnerved; unnerving.
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