Etymology
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steno- 

before vowels sten-, word-forming element meaning "narrow," from Greek stenos "narrow, strait," as a noun "straits of the sea, narrow strip of land," also metaphorically, "close, confined; scanty, petty," from PIE *sten- "narrow."

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Euripus 

strait between Euboea and the Greek mainland, notorious for its violent and unpredictable currents, from eu- "good, well" (see eu-) + rhipe "rush." Apparently euphemistic.

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Scylla (n.)

female sea-monster in the Strait of Messina, presiding genius of a dangerous rock in the passage, from Latinized form of Greek Skylla, Skyllē, a name of unknown origin, traditionally associated with skylax "a young dog, dog," from skyllein "to tear." Compare Charybdis.

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Bering 

strait and sea between Alaska and Siberia, named for Danish explorer Vitus Bering, who worked for Peter the Great and led the first European expedition to sight Alaska, in 1741.

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Baltic (adj.)

1580s, "pertaining to the brackish sea between the Scandinavian peninsula and Eastern Europe," from Medieval Latin Balticus, perhaps from Lithuanian baltas "white" or Scandinavian balta "belt; strait" (in reference to its narrow entranceway). In German, it is Ostsee, literally "east sea." From 1887 as the name of a language group comprising Lithuanian, Lettish, and Old Prussian.

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Bosphorus 

a Latin error for bosporus, from Greek bosporos, a name applied to several channels or straits between seas, literally "ox's ford," from bous "ox" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow") + poros "passage, ford" (see pore (n.)). It was especially the name of the strait between the Sea of Marmora and the Black Sea (the Thracian Bosphorus).

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camisole (n.)

1816, "short, light garment with sleeves," formerly worn by women as morning-dress, from French camisole (16c.), from Provençal camisola "mantle," diminutive of camisa "shirt," from Late Latin camisia "shirt, nightgown" (see chemise). In modern use a sleeveless undergarment for women (1900). In late 19c. it generally meant "strait-jacket, a restraint for lunatics."

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invictus 

Latin adjective, "unconquered, unsubdued, invincible," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + victus, past participle of vincere "to conquer, overcome" (from nasalized form of PIE root *weik- (3) "to fight, conquer").

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate,
I am the captain of my soul.
[William Ernest Henley, "Invictus"]
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Fata Morgana (n.)

1818, literally "Fairy Morgana," mirage especially common in the Strait of Messina, Italy, from Morgana, the "Morgan le Fay" of Anglo-French poetry, sister of King Arthur, located in Calabria by Norman settlers. Morgan is Welsh, "sea-dweller." There is perhaps, too, here an influence of Arabic marjan, literally "pearl," also a fem. proper name, popularly the name of a sorceress.

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pylon (n.)

1823, "gateway to an Egyptian temple," from Greek pylon "gateway," from pylē "gate, wing of a pair of double gates; an entrance, entrance into a country; mountain pass; narrow strait of water," a word of unknown etymology, perhaps a foreign technical term. The usual word for "door" in PIE in Greek took the form thyra (see thyroid). Meaning "tower for guiding aviators" (1909) led to that of "steel tower for high-tension wires" (1923).

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