Etymology
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corpulent (adj.)

"fleshy, portly, stout," late 14c., from Old French corpulent "stout, fat," from Latin corpulentus "fleshy, fat," from corpus "body" (from PIE root *kwrep- "body, form, appearance") + -ulentus "full of." Leigh Hunt was sent to prison for two years for calling the Prince Regent corpulent in print in 1812.

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bulky (adj.)
mid-15c., "plump, stout, of great size," from bulk (n.) + -y (2). Often with a suggestion of "unwieldy, clumsy." Related: Bulkiness.
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portly (adj.)

late 15c., portli, "stately, dignified, of noble appearance and carriage," from port (n.3) "bearing, carriage" + -ly (1). Meaning "stout, somewhat large and unwieldy in person" is attested by 1590s.

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prunella (n.)

stout textile used for men's robes and gowns, 1650s, from French prunelle, noun use of adjective meaning "plum-colored," from prunelle, diminutive of prune "plum" (see prune (n.)). In English, prunelle "small plum" is attested from mid-15c.

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Percheron (n.)

type of horse, large and stout but relatively free in action, by 1875, from French Percheron, adjective formed from le Perche, region south of Normandy where horses were bred that were strong, light, and fast.

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plenitude (n.)

early 15c., "fullness, completeness, perfection," from Old French plenitude and directly from Latin plenitudinem (nominative plenitudo) "abundance, completeness, fullness," from plenus "full, filled, greatly crowded; stout, pregnant; abundant, abounding; complete," from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill." Related: Plenitudinary.

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stocky (adj.)
c. 1400, "made of wood," from stock (n.1). Of plants, "of stout and sturdy growth" (not weedy) it is recorded from 1620s. Of persons, "thick-set," 1670s, suggestive of tree trunks, but compare also stock in sense of "trunk of the human body" (late 14c.).
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plenary (adj.)

early 15c., plenarie, "full, complete," earlier plenar (mid-13c.), from Old French plenier and directly from Medieval Latin plenarius "entire, complete," from Latin plenus "full, filled, greatly crowded; stout, pregnant; abundant, abounding; complete," from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill." Of an assembly, "fully attended," 1530s. Meaning "having full power" is from 1861. Related: Plenarily.

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drill (n.3)

also drilling, kind of coarse, stout twilled cloth, 1743, from French drill, from German drillich "heavy, coarse cotton or linen fabric," from Old High German adjective drilich "threefold," from Latin trilix (genitive trilicis) "having three threads, triple-twilled," from tri- (see tri-) + licium "thread," a word of unknown etymology. So called in reference to the method of weaving it.

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billy (n.)
"club," 1848, American English, originally burglars' slang for "crowbar;" meaning "policeman's club" first recorded 1856, probably from nickname of William, applied to various objects (compare jack, jimmy, jenny). But compare French bille "a short, stout stick" (see billet (n.1)). Billy-goat as a familiar name for a male goat is from 1826.
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