Etymology
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CD 

1979 as an abbreviation of compact disc as a digital system of information storage. By 1959 as an abbreviation of certificate of deposit "written statement from a bank acknowledging it has received a sum of money from the person named" (1819).

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pipe (n.2)

early 14c., "type of cask, large storage container;" mid-14c., "large vessel for storing wine," from Old French pipe "liquid measure, cask for wine," from a special use of Vulgar Latin *pipa "a pipe" (see pipe (n.1)).

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cloak-room (n.)

also cloakroom, 1827, "a room connected with an assembly-hall, opera-house, etc., where cloaks and other articles are temporarily deposited," from cloak (n.) + room (n.). Later extended to railway offices for temporary storage of luggage, and by mid-20c. sometimes a euphemism for "bathroom, lavatory."

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repository (n.)

late 15c. (Caxton), "vessel, etc., for storage," from French repositoire or directly from Late Latin repositorium "store," in classical Latin, "a stand on which food is placed," from noun use of repositus, past participle of reponere "put away, store" (see repose (v.2)).

The figurative sense of "place where anything immaterial is thought of as stored" is recorded from 1640s; commercial sense of "place where things are kept for sale" is by 1759.

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spout (n.)
late 14c., from spout (v.). Cognate with Middle Dutch spoit, North Frisian spütj. It was the slang term for the lift in a pawnbroker's shop, the device which took up articles for storage, hence figurative phrase up the spout "lost, hopeless, gone beyond recall" (1812).
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hutch (n.)
c. 1200, "storage chest" (also applied to the biblical "ark of God"), from Old French huche "chest, trunk, coffer; coffin; kneading trough; shop displaying merchandise," from Medieval Latin hutica "chest," a word of uncertain origin. Sense of "cupboard for food or dishes" first recorded 1670s; that of "box-like pen for an animal" is from c. 1600.
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bladder (n.)
Old English blædre (West Saxon), bledre (Anglian) "(urinary) bladder," also "blister, pimple," from Proto-Germanic *blodram "something inflated" (source also of Old Norse blaðra, Old Saxon bladara, Old High German blattara, German Blatter, Dutch blaar), from PIE root *bhle- "to blow." Extended senses from early 13c. from animal bladders used for buoyancy, storage, etc.
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bay (n.2)
"opening in a wall," especially a space between two columns, late 14c. from Old French baee "opening, hole, gulf," noun use of fem. past participle of bayer "to gape, yawn," from Medieval Latin batare "gape," perhaps of imitative origin. Meaning "compartment for storage: is from 1550s. Somewhat confused with bay (n.1) "inlet of the sea," it is the bay in sick-bay and bay window (early 15c.).
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pound (n.2)

"enclosed place for animals," especially an enclosure maintained by authorities for confining cattle or other beasts when at large or trespassing, late 14c., from a late Old English word attested in compounds (such as pundfald "penfold, pound"), related to pyndan "to dam up, enclose (water)," and thus from the same root as pond. Ultimate origin unknown. Also used as a storage place for other goods seized; as a lot for impounded motor vehicles by 1970.

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cornhole (v.)

synonymous with "do anal intercourse" by 1949, said to be by 1930s and said to be a reference is to a game played in the farming regions of the Ohio Valley in the U.S. from 19c., in which players take turns throwing a small bag full of feed corn at a raised platform with a hole in it, but references to this are wanting. From corn (n.1) + hole (n.). It also was the name of a kind of corn silo or underground storage pit for corn.

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