Etymology
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suscitate (v.)
"stir up, excite," 1520s, from Latin suscitatus, past participle of suscitare (see resuscitate). Related: Suscitated; suscitating; suscitation.
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roust (v.)

"raise or arouse, stir up" (from one's bed, etc.), 1650s, probably an alteration of rouse with excrescent -t. Related: Rousted; rousting.

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excite (v.)

mid-14c., exciten, "to move, stir up, instigate," from Old French esciter (12c.) or directly from Latin excitare "rouse, call out, summon forth, produce," frequentative of exciere "call forth, instigate," from ex "out" (see ex-) + ciere "set in motion, call" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion"). Of feelings, "to stir up, rouse," from late 14c. Of bodily organs or tissues, from 1831. Sense of "rouse the emotions of, emotionally agitate" is attested from 1821.

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glucagon (n.)
1923, from gluco- + Greek agon, present participle of agein "push forward, put in motion; stir up; excite, urge," from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move."
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poker (n.1)

"the iron bar with which men stir the fire" [Johnson], 1530s, agent noun from poke (v.). The Middle English pokere (early 12c.) might mean "one who stores or bags grain" (from poke (n.1)).

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budge (v.)

1580s (intransitive) "to move, stir, change position, give way a little;" 1590s (transitive) "change the position of;" from French bougier "to move, stir" (Modern French bouger), from Vulgar Latin *bullicare "to bubble, boil" (hence, "to be in motion"), from Latin bullire "to boil" (see boil (v.)). Compare Spanish bullir "to move about, bustle;" Portuguese bulir "to move a thing from its place." In 16c. canting slang, "a general verb of action, usually stealthy action" (Farmer, "Musa Pedestris," who gives among his examples budge a beak "to give the constable the slip," budge out or off "to sneak off"). Related: Budged; budging.

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puddle (v.)

mid-15c., "to dabble in water, poke in mud," from puddle (n.); the extended sense in iron manufacture is "turn and stir (molten iron) in a furnace (to expel oxygen and carbon)." Related: Puddled; puddling.

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trouble (v.)
c. 1200, from Old French trubler, metathesis of turbler, torbler "to trouble, disturb; make cloudy, stir up, mix" (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *turbulare, from Late Latin turbidare "to trouble, make turbid," from Latin turbidus (see turbid). Related: Troubled; troubling.
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excitation (n.)

late 14c., excitacioun, "act of rousing to action; instigation, incitement; state of being excited," from Old French excitation, from Late Latin excitationem (nominative excitatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of excitare "to call out, wake, rouse, stir up" (see excite).

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scramble (v.)
1580s (intransitive), perhaps a nasalized variant of scrabble (v.), in its sense of "to struggle, to scrape quickly." Transitive sense "to stir or toss together randomly" is from 1822. Broadcasting sense "to make unintelligible" is attested from 1927. Related: Scrambled; scrambling. Scrambled eggs first recorded 1843.
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