Etymology
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nudism (n.)

"The cult and practice of going unclothed" [OED], 1929, from French nudisme (see nude + -ism). Nudist "one who practices nudism" appeared at the same time.

Made in Germany, imported to France, is the cult of Nudism, a mulligan stew of vegetarianism, physical culture and pagan worship. ["Time," July 1, 1929]
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jambalaya (n.)

1849, from Louisiana French, from Provençal jambalaia "stew of rice and fowl," from jamb-, which Anthony Buccini of nyfoodstory.com argues is "is not a native Occitan [word] but rather enters the language first as part of a word borrowed from the Neapolitan dialect of southern Italy, namely, ciambotta, presumably during the late Middle Ages."

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pho (n.)

type of Vietnamese soup, probably from French feu "fire" (see focus (n.)) "as in pot-au-feu, a stew of meat and vegetables of which the broth is drunk separately as a soup" [Ayto, "Diner's Dictionary"] which would have been acquired in Vietnamese during the French colonial period.

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curry (n.)

kind of sauce or relish much used in Indian cookery, from the leaves of a southwest Asian plant related to the lemon, 1680s, from Tamil (Dravidian) kari "sauce, relish for rice," also "a bite, bit, morsel." As "meat or vegetable stew flavored with curry powder," 1747 in British English.

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porringer (n.)

"a porridge-dish; a small vessel deeper than a plate, usually with upright sides, a nearly flat bottom, and one or two ears," late 15c., alteration of potynger, potager "small dish for stew," from Middle English potage (see pottage) by the same course of changes that produced porridge; and with unetymological -n- by 1530s (compare passenger).

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ratatouille (n.)

Provençal dish of mixed vegetables simmered in olive oil, 1877, from French ratatouille (19c.). The first element is of uncertain etymology, the second is evidently touiller "to stir up," which Ayto writes was "applied, often disparagingly, to any stew," and which Gamillscheg writes is ultimately from Latin tudes "hammer."

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mescal (n.)

"plant of the genus Agave," found in deserts of Mexico and southwestern U.S., especially the American aloe, or maguey plant, 1702, from Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) mexcalli "fermented drink made from agave," from metl "agave" + ixcalli "stew." Meaning "intoxicating liquor from fermented juice (pulque) of the agave" is attested in English from 1828. Also the name of a small desert cactus (peyote) found in northern Mexico and southern Texas (1885).

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hop (v.1)
Old English hoppian "to spring, leap; to dance; to limp," from Proto-Germanic *hupnojan (source also of Old Norse hoppa "hop, skip," Dutch huppen, German hüpfen "to hop"). Transitive sense from 1791. Related: Hopped; hopping. Hopping-john "stew of bacon with rice and peas" attested from 1838. Hopping mad is from 1670s.
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pottage (n.)

"soup, meat-broth," c. 1200, potage, "thick stew or soup," literally "food prepared in a pot, that which is put in a pot," from Old French potage "vegetable soup, food cooked in a pot," from pot "pot" (see pot (n.1)). The spelling with double -t- is from early 15c.; the later spelling with one -t- is a later borrowing (see potage).

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a la mode (adv.)
also alamode, 1640s, from French à la mode (15c.), literally "in the (prevailing) fashion" (see a la + mode (n.2)). In 17c., sometimes nativized as all-a-mode. Cookery sense in reference to a dessert served with ice cream is 1903, American English; earlier it was used of a kind of beef stew or soup (1753).
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