Etymology
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exhaust (n.)

"waste gas," 1848, originally from steam engines, from exhaust (v.). In reference to internal combustion engines by 1896. Exhaust pipe, which carries away waste gas or steam from an engine, is by 1849.

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espresso (n.)
coffee made under steam pressure, 1945, from Italian (caffe) espresso, from espresso "pressed out," past participle of esprimere, from Latin exprimere "press out, squeeze out" (see express (v.1)). In reference to the steam pressure.
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choo-choo (n.)
Child's name for "steam-engine locomotive," 1895, echoic (choo-choo cars is attested from 1891).
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vaporous (adj.)
late 14c., from Late Latin vaporosus "full of steam," from Latin vaporus, from vapor (see vapor).
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evaporation (n.)
late 14c., from Old French évaporation and directly from Latin evaporationem (nominative evaporatio), noun of action from past participle stem of evaporare "disperse in vapor or steam," from assimilated form of ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + vapor "steam" (see vapor).
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vaporetto (n.)
Venetian public transit canal-motorboat, 1926, from Italian vaporetto, diminutive of vapore "steam," from Latin vapor (see vapor (n.)).
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Vesuvius 
volcano near Naples, of unknown origin; perhaps from Celtic root *ves- "mountain" or Oscan fesf "smoke, steam." Related: Vesuvian.
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fewmet (n.)

also fumet, "excrement, dung of a game animal" (especially a hart), early 15c., fumes, from Old French fumees; the modern ending apparently is a formation in Anglo-French, from fumer, from Latin fumare "to smoke, steam," from fumus "smoke, steam, fume" (from PIE root *dheu- (1) "dust, vapor, smoke"). Related: Fewmets.

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fume (v.)

c. 1400, "to fumigate" (transitive), from Old French fumer "to smoke, burn" (12c.), from Latin fumare "to smoke, steam," from fumus "smoke, steam, fume" (from PIE root *dheu- (1) "dust, vapor, smoke"). Intransitive meaning "throw off smoke, emit vapor" is from 1530s; the figurative sense "show anger, be irritated" is slightly earlier (1520s). Related: Fumed; fumes; fuming.

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atmo- 
word-forming element meaning "vapor," from Greek atmos "vapor, steam," from PIE *awet-mo-, from root *wet- (1) "to blow" (also "to inspire, spiritually arouse;" see wood (adj.)).
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