Etymology
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ablegation (n.)
Origin and meaning of ablegation

"act of sending abroad or away," 1610s, from Latin ablegationem (nominative ablegatio) "a sending off or away," noun of action from past-participle stem of ablegare "send away on a commission," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + legare "send with a commission, send as an ambassador" (see legate).

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employment (n.)

mid-15c., "the spending of money," from Middle English emploien (see employ) + -ment. From 1590s as "an errand or commission;" 1640s as "a person's regular occupation or business."

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brokerage (n.)
mid-15c., "a broker's trade," from broker (n.) + -age. Also, in 17c., "a pimp's trade." From 1620s as "fee or commission charged for doing business as a broker."
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Cheka 
early Soviet secret police, 1921, from Russian initials of Chrezvychainaya Komissiya "Extraordinary Commission (for Combating Counter-Revolution);" set up 1917, superseded 1922 by G.P.U.
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ombudsman (n.)

"official appointed to investigate complaints by individuals against institutions or authorities," 1959, from Swedish ombudsman, literally "commission man" (specifically in reference to the office of justitieombudsmannen, which heard and investigated complaints by individuals against abuses of the state); cognate with Old Norse umboðsmaðr, from umboð "commission" (from um- "around," from Proto-Germanic umbi, from PIE root *ambhi- "around," + boð "command," from PIE root *bheudh- "be aware, make aware") + maðr "man" (from PIE root *man- (1) "man").

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decommission (v.)

"to take (something) out of active service," 1922, originally in reference to warships, from de- + commission (v.) in the nautical sense of "be transferred from the naval yard and placed in the command of an officer." Related: Decommissioned; decommissioning.

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trilateral (adj.)
1650s, from Late Latin trilaterus "three-sided;" see tri- + lateral. The Trilateral Commission (representing Japan, the U.S., and Europe) was founded 1973. Related: Trilateralism; trilaterally.
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legate (n.)

mid-12c., "authorized representative of the Pope," from Old French legat and directly from Latin legatus "ambassador, envoy," originally "provided with a commission," past participle of legare "send as a deputy, send with a commission, charge, bequeath," possibly literally "engage by contract" and related to lex (genitive legis) "contract, law," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather." General sense of "ambassador, delegate, messenger of a state or authority" is from late 14c. in English. Related: Legator; legatee; legatine.

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buy-in (n.)
"act of obtaining an interest in," 1970, from verbal phrase buy in "to purchase a commission or stock" (1826), from buy (v.) + in (adv.). To buy into "obtain an interest in by purchase" (as of stock shares) is recorded from 1680s.
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delegation (n.)

1610s, "action of delegating" (earlier in this sense was delegacie, mid-15c.); perhaps a native formation, perhaps from French délégation, or directly from Latin delegationem (nominative delegatio) "assignment, delegation," noun of action from past-participle stem of delegare "to send as a representative," from de "from, away" (see de-) + legare "send with a commission," possibly literally "engage by contract" and related to lex (genitive legis) "contract, law," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather." Meaning "persons sent by commission" is from 1818; meaning "a state's elected representatives, taken collectively," is U.S. political usage from 1828.

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