Etymology
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upstate (adv.)

1901, American English, from up (adv.) + state (n.).

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statement (n.)

1775, "what is stated," from state (v.) + -ment. From 1789 as "action of stating;" 1885 in the commercial sense "document displaying debits and credits."

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stateside (adj.)

also state-side, 1944, World War II U.S. military slang, from the States "United States" (see state (n.2)) + side.

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understate (v.)

1781, from under + state (v.). Related: Understated; understating.

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stateroom (n.)

also state-room, 1703, room reserved for ceremonial occasions; earlier (1650s) "a captain's cabin;" from room (n.) + state (n.1) in a sense also preserved in stately.

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statesman (n.)

1590s, after French homme d'état; see state (n.1) + man (n.). Related: Statesmanly; statesmanship. Stateswoman attested from c. 1600.

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raison d'etat (n.)

1869, from French raison d'état "reason of state," thus "convenience of the government." See reason (n.) + state (n.2).

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statist (n.)

1580s, "statesman;" 1803, "statistician;" 1976 as "supporter of statism;" 1960 as an adjective in this sense; from state (n.2) + -ist.

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misstate (v.)

also mis-state, "state wrongly, make an erroneous representation of," 1640s, from mis- (1) + state (v.). Related: Misstated; misstating.

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instate (v.)

also enstate, "to put someone in a certain state or condition," c. 1600, from in + state (n.1). Related: Instated; instating.

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