Etymology
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ISBN 
1969, acronym for International Standard Book Number.
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ancient (n.)
"standard-bearer," 1590s, short for ancient-bearer (1570s), from ancient "flag, banner, standard" (1550s), a corruption of ensign (q.v.). Archaic, but preserved in Shakespeare's character Aunchient Pistoll in "Henry V."
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labarum (n.)
the imperial standard adopted by Constantine, from Greek labaron, which is of unknown origin.
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ASCII 
1963, initialism (acronym) from "American Standard Code for Information Interchange."
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banner (n.)

c. 1200, "piece of cloth attached to the upper end of a pole or staff," from Old French baniere "flag, banner, standard" (12c., Modern French bannière), from Late Latin bandum "standard," borrowed from Frankish or another West Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *bandwa- "identifying sign, banner, standard," also "company under a banner" (source also of Gothic bandwa "a sign"), from suffixed form of PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine."

Formerly the standard of a king, lord, or knight, behind which his followers marched to war and to which they rallied in battle. Figurative sense of "anything displayed as a profession of principles" is from early 14c. Of newspaper headlines that stream across the top of the page, from 1913.

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criterion (n.)

"a standard of judgment or criticism, rule by which opinion or conduct can be tested," 1660s, from Latinized form of Greek kriterion "means for judging, standard," from krites "judge," from PIE root *krei- "to sieve," thus "discriminate, distinguish." Used in English as a Greek word from 1610s.

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normality (n.)

"character or state of being in accordance with rule or standard," 1833, from normal + -ity.

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kilogram (n.)
"one thousand grams," standard of mass in the metric system, 1797, from French kilogramme (1795); see kilo- + gram.
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titration (n.)
in chemistry, "the establishment of a standard strength or degree of concentration of a solution," 1864, noun of action from titrate (v.).
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miz 

1907 as graphing of U.S. Southern pronunciation of Mrs. or Miss (n.2); by 1972 as the standard pronunciation of Ms.

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