Etymology
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detrude (v.)

"to thrust or force down," 1540s, from Latin detrudere, from de "down" (see de-) + trudere "to thrust," "to thrust, push," from PIE *treud- "to press, push, squeeze" (see threat). Related: Detruded; detruding; detrusion.

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espresso (n.)
coffee made under steam pressure, 1945, from Italian (caffe) espresso, from espresso "pressed out," past participle of esprimere, from Latin exprimere "press out, squeeze out" (see express (v.1)). In reference to the steam pressure.
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squash (v.)
"to crush, squeeze," early 14c., squachen, from Old French esquasser, escasser "to crush, shatter, destroy, break," from Vulgar Latin *exquassare, from Latin ex "out" (see ex-) + quassare "to shatter" (see quash "to crush"). Related: Squashed; squashing.
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extrusion (n.)

"the act of extruding; a thrusting or driving out, expulsion," 1530s, formed as a noun of action from past-participle stem of extrudere, from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + trudere "to thrust, push," from PIE *treud- "to press, push, squeeze" (see threat).

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pinch (v.)

early 13c., pinchen, "to pluck (an eyebrow);" mid-14c. "compress between the finger and thumb or some device, squeeze between two hard, opposing bodies," from Old North French *pinchier "to pinch, squeeze, nip; steal" (Old French pincier, Modern French pincer), a word of uncertain origin, possibly from Vulgar Latin *punctiare "to pierce," which might be a blend of Latin punctum "point" + *piccare "to pierce."

From mid-14c. as "to pain, torment." Of tight shoes, from 1570s. Meaning "to steal" in English is from 1650s. Sense of "to be stingy" is recorded from early 14c. Related: Pinched; pinching.

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compression (n.)

c. 1400, "act of compressing, state of being compressed," from Old French compression (14c.) and directly from Latin compressionem (nominative compressio) "a pressing together," noun of action from past participle stem of comprimere "to squeeze" (see compress (v.)). Related: Compressional. Compressional wave is attested from 1887.

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extrude (v.)

of things, "to thrust out; force, press, or crowd out; expel," 1560s, from Latin extrudere "to thrust out, drive away," from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + trudere "to thrust, push," from PIE *treud- "to press, push, squeeze" (see threat). Related: Extruded; extruding.

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sphincter (n.)

1570s, from French sphincter, from Late Latin sphincter "contractile muscle," from Greek sphinkter "band, lace, anything that binds tight," from sphingein "to squeeze, bind," of unknown origin. First used in anatomical sense by Galen. There are several in the body; the one usually meant is the sphincter ani.

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thong (n.)
Old English þwong, þwang "narrow strip of leather" (used as a cord, band, strip, etc.), from Proto-Germanic *thwang- (source also of Old Norse þvengr), from PIE root *twengh- "to press in on, to restrain" (source also of Old English twengan "to pinch, squeeze"). As a kind of sandal, first attested 1965; as a kind of bikini briefs, 1990.
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crumple (v.)

early 14c.,  cromplen, crumplen, "press into irregular folds, rumple, wrinkle," also intransitive, "contract into wrinkles, shrink, shrivel," frequentative of crumpen "to curl up" (from Old English crump "bent, crooked"), from Proto-Germanic *krumbo- "to press, squeeze, compress" (source also of German krumm "crooked, warped"). Related: Crumpled; crumpling.

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