Etymology
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halfpenny (n.)
mid-13c. (though implied in Old English healfpenigwurð "halfpenny-worth"); see half + penny.
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fippeny 
1802, short for five penny; further contracted form fip attested by 1822.
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outspend (v.)

mid-15c., outspenden, "to consume totally, use up," from out- + spend (v.). Meaning "to spend more than another or others" is from 1840. Related: Outspent; outspending. Outspent is attested from 1650s as "exhausted, thoroughly spent or wearied."

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denier (n.1)

medieval French silver coin corresponding to the English penny, early 15c., from Old French dener, a small coin of slight value, roughly equivalent to the English penny, in use in France from the time of Charlemagne to early modern times, from Latin denarium, from denarius, name of a Roman coin (source also of Spanish dinero); see denarius.

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spending (n.)
late Old English, verbal noun from spend (v.). Spending-money is from 1590s.
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lavish (v.)
"spend or bestow profusely," 1540s, from lavish (adj.). Related: Lavished; lavisher; lavishing.
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pringle (n.)

"small silver coin of about the value of a penny," formerly current in Scotland and northern England, 1680s, a word of unknown origin.

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catchpenny (n.)

"something of little value but externally attractive and made to sell quickly," 1760, from catch (v.) + penny (n.). Also as an adjective.

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summerize (v.)
1797, "to spend the summer," from summer (n.1) + -ize. From 1935 as "to prepare (something) for summer." Related: Summerized; summerizing.
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spent (adj.)
"consumed," mid-15c., past-participle adjective from spend. Of time, "passed, over," from 1520s; as "worn out, exhausted from overwork," 1560s.
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