Etymology
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bisque (n.1)
"stewed, thickened soup," 1640s, bisk, from French bisque "crayfish soup" (17c.), said to be an altered form of Biscaye "Biscay" (see Biscay). Gamillscheg says: "Volkstümliche Entlehnung aus norm.bisque 'schlechtes Getränk.'" Modern form in English from 1731.
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sup (v.1)
"eat the evening meal," c. 1300, from Old French super, soper "dine, sup, dip bread in soup or wine, sop up" (Modern French souper), which probably is from soupe "broth" (see soup), until recently still the traditional evening meal of French workers.
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julienne (n.)
kind of clear soup made of chopped carrots and other vegetables cooked in meat-broth, 1841, from French (18c.), literally "(soup made) in the manner of Julien" (see Julian), presumably the name of an otherwise unknown cook (though Century Dictionary suggests "a French caterer in Boston"). Later of vegetables cut in small thin strips (1889). Related: Julienned.
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goulash (n.)
1866, from Hungarian gulyáshús, from gulyás "herdsman" + hús "meat." In Hungarian, "beef or lamb soup made by herdsmen while pasturing."
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vichyssoise (n.)
1939, French, in full crême vichyssoise glacée, literally "iced cream (soup) of Vichy" (see Vichy).
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puree (n.)

kind of broth or soup made from vegetables, etc., boiled to a pulp and passed through a sieve, 1707, from French purée, a word of disputed and uncertain origin. Compare porridge.

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colander (n.)

"vessel perforated with little holes to allow liquid to run off," mid-14c., coloundour, probably altered (with unetymological -n-)  from Medieval Latin colatorium "strainer" from Latin colatus, past participle of colare "to strain," from colum "sieve, strainer, wicker fishing net," which is of uncertain origin.

Cognate with French couloir, Spanish colador, Italian colatojo. The word in English had a wide range of spellings (cullender, coloner, cullyandre, etc.), reflecting uncertainty of the etymology. "The form of the Eng. word appears to be due to some perversion; but its exact history is obscure" [OED]. As a verb, "to pass through a colander," 1874; earlier "riddle with holes" (1862). Related: Colandered.

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bouillon (n.)
broth or soup from boiled beef or other meat, 1650s, from French bouillon (11c.), noun use of past participle of bouillir "to boil," from Old French bolir (see boil (v.)).
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gumbo (n.)
soup thickened with okra, 1805, from Louisiana French, probably ultimately from Central Bantu dialect (compare Mbundu ngombo "okra"). Also used for "the creole patois of Louisiana" (1838).
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percolation (n.)

"the act of straining or filtering through some porous material," 1610s, from Latin percolationem (nominative percolatio) "a straining through; the act of filtering," noun of action from past-participle stem of percolare "to strain through, filter," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + colare "to strain," from colum "a strainer," which is of uncertain origin.

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